Television, Heart Issues, Diabetes And The Cancer State Of Mind

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“Watching Tv” by Sandra Vos

It would be easy to tout facts such as 80% of sedentary American adults watch 3.5 hours of television a day. I could also describe how 92% of all Americans have a television set in their home which consumes more than half of their available leisure time. These facts are fairly well known.

However, a study done at the National Cancer Institute where 221,000 active individuals between the ages of 40-71 years of age still showed a predisposition to heart disease and cancer where T.V. was a 3-4 hour daily habit. This may not be such common knowledge. Also, did you know that chronic television watching is linked to incidences of  diabetes, obesity, influenza/pneumonia, Parkinson’s and liver issues as well?

Now, if I open the pages of Michael J. Lincoln’s book, “Messages From The Body” and review the reasons for a few of these diseases cited above, you might perceive the link to how watching television precipitates the state of mind before the disease manifests on the physical level. Here are excerpts from Lincoln’s book from each section specified:

  • Cancer – “Powerlessness-rage.” They feel overwhelmed and devastated, with a sense of intense emptiness in their life. There has been many years of inner conflict, guilt, hurt, grief, despair, resentment, confusion and/or tension surrounding their deepest personal issues. It is connected with feelings of hopelessness, inadequacy, helplessness and self-rejection. They see no possibility of relevance or effectiveness from the Cosmic realm. They have disharmonious attitudes towards parts of themselves that they don’t want to deal with.”  
  • Heart Issues – “They are not expressing and manifesting love with others-now and/or before. They operate out of scarcity assumptions and the belief in constricting limitations. They tend to judge themselves a failure and therefore work furiously to accomplish on the job and to dominate others. They are full of tension, anxiety, resentment and suppressed aggression. Underneath, they are frightened children full of regrets, sorrow and remorse for a life wasted and a “vast wasteland” experience. They are the product of highly judgmental and demanding parenting that never gave them the message that they were good enough.
  • Diabetes – “Boulevard of broken dreams.” They are longing for what might have been in their life, and they are in a state of emotional shock. They have a deep dissatisfaction with their life and an accompanying self-dislike. There is intense sorrow and a sense of starving to death in the midst of plenty, of being surrounded by most of the things that have meaning without their being available to them. They have a great deal of despairing desperation, depression and demoralization. It’s a “. . . but not for me” attitude that is often accompanied by a fair amount of feeling very sorry for themselves. There is no sweetness left in life for them, and there is insufficient joy in their life.

Our predecessor, Rudolf Steiner, was a Goethean scientist who spoke liberally about stages of development in seven year cycles. He cited that when a child is first born, they’re most focused on physical development. It takes a lot of internal, mineral, forces to grow a body from its total dependency on Mom and Dad to be able to first sit, then crawl, run and then at 50-70 pounds at age 7, dribble a basketball with any kind of coordination.

From the ages of  7-14, Steiner speaks to how we are more etherically developing our capacity to receive impressions. This is the time in our development when we’re naturally and resonantly ready to be engaged more with art, story (fairy tales and putting on plays), music, eurythmy (a type of rhythmical, dance-like movement mostly found in Waldorf Schools), creativity (watercolors, drawing, sculpting, etc.), hand-work (knitting for metabolic limb coordination), sport (healthy competition) and fully actuating our imaginal forces through the etheric body.

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From 14 to 21 we develop our astral bodies through actualizing our desires, goals, dreams through fantasy and socialization. This is when we experience the onset of puberty and hopefully a healthy unfolding of our sexuality. However, “Waldorf educators saw a direct link to this astral body and the watching of television. The scenes, the lack of imagination involved, and the topics covered on most channels would obviously bring on the astral stage of the body at an early age from the outside in. This was one reason that television was banned from Waldorf schools. Modern researchers, however, have just recently made this connection when they recently announced, “Watching Television may Quicken the Onset of Puberty” (Dr. Laura Markham, 2006).

In Markham’s article, based on 35 different research studies she states that this connection has a lot to do with the hormone melatonin. Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland in the brain, which plays a key role in regulating the body’s internal clock. Light emitted by television screens suppresses melatonin levels in the blood, which disrupts sleep patterns of children and teens as well as the age at which they enter puberty. It is also interesting to note that the problems of early-onset puberty have baffled researchers since 1950. This was the same date in which televisions became widely owned in the United States.”

On one Waldorf school website from Ireland they state, “Television, as well as film, videos, DVDs, recorded music, computers and electronic games have a very powerful effect on children. It can take several days for the effects of a single video to wear off. If children are watching every day, the effects never wear off at all; many children now speak a lot of the time in ‘cartoon’ voices, make ‘sound effects’ to accompany their jerky movements (kicking, punching) and compulsively repeat lines from videos they have seen over and over again. This is now seen as normal childish behavior, but it really comes from these media, not from the children themselves.”  I once served an Autistic child who could “script” word for word every Disney movie she’d ever seen!

The other consideration is that we need time in order to process impressions as our thoughts go through a cycle of maturation. Watching television inhibits this natural process. Steiner stated that, “What is learned more slowly at any given age is more surely and healthily absorbed by the organism, than what is crammed into it.” (Spiritual Ground for Education by Rudolf Steiner).

This is also why homework is not promoted in Waldorf education, to give ample time for a child to wholly integrate all of the art, story, plays, music, and movement they were engaged with from the inside out to settle down into their etheric mind (where memory is stored) during the remainder of waking consciousness into the sleep consciousness.

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“Noam and his lemon-baby doll” by Michael Radwin

They will wake the next day full of reflections from the day before, having crystallized their impressions into thoughts. Children become sick, first mentally and then physically if this natural rhythm is not allowed for, given that the externalized impressions will override this capacity for thinking. The child’s head, instead, will be filled with images from video games or television. Once again, his own concentration and imagination will have been denied him. He’ll deem that life occurs, out there in T.V. land, not internally in his own world of self-actualized and fructified dreams. The application of a properly threaded Will (male gesture) and Wisdom (female gesture) will be hobbled.

The other problem is that if we’re told at allopathic schools that there is little room for the bubbling up of our internal creativity and that we have to succumb to standardized testing instead, we will begin to feel the light go out on our internal capacity for imagination and freedom of expression. A generalized malaise, and “why bother” attitude starts to show up. It might even lead to suicidal depression in our teens. I know because I serve teens brought to me for Heilkunst Treatment in this state more often than I’d like.

These external dumbing down forces start to spread into the rest of our lives. The why bother gesture begins to permeate everything to the point where a sufferer opts to live externally, watching others live, fulfilling lives through their externalized perpetual fantasies, while the watcher sits on the sidelines and simply watches or controls a gaming console. It becomes a lot less risky to live life on the sidelines physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually if we’ve repeatedly gotten the message that what we’d like to contribute is not wholly valued.

I serve so many of these checked out children and adults, that it is astounding. It is an Aurum (homeopathic rx for the loss of one’s inner gold) state, in which they’ve forgotten their inner value. They’re not connected to their true heart’s desire (heart disease) and their lives feel profoundly un-lived (cancer). In many cases, they don’t even know what they’d like to be anymore, either in the present, or later on when they grow up, as they’ve not even thought to ask themselves this question anymore. They’re utterly resigned. T.V. perpetuates dissociation, escapism, a disengaged onlooker society. The video game and pornography industry is also counting on this physical, mental and emotional inertia of the watcher on the living room couch with his bag of cookies or chips.

Onlookers over time are numb, shut-down and not very resourceful. Perfect if the government, in cahoots with Big Pharma, want to be passing bills for mandatory vaccinations through congress without folks knowing or caring. No, you won’t see that on CNN or allopathic news. That content is only peppered liberally through my personal Twitter stream where my ire is completely provoked to write books and articles about this insidious phenomenon. #vaxxed #cdcwhistleblower  Sometimes I actually wonder if there is still anybody out there?!

In Heilkunst Medicine, we also discuss at length a Chthonic, fear-induced state entitled Bufo. In nature, Bufo Rana is a big, meaty, overgrown toad with big slobbery lips and a quick tongue. He sits  for hours, unmoving, staring at a fixed point in his environment, barely blinking waiting for a juicy fly to pass by, otherwise he is sedentary, conserving his cold reptilian energy, seemingly unaffected by his ambient. In the human disease state, you’ll observe these characteristics in addition to symptoms of lasciviousness, lewdness, lustfulness, and wantonness. They’re almost drooling as they can’t wait to get home to watch pornography and attempt self-gratification in the basest of ways in private. I’ve served many modern men, and women too, in chronic Bufo states.

I’ve also known two men in my life who were chronic T.V. watchers. One of them watched the news on a popular station from sun-up to sundown. He also developed a tumor the size of a grapefruit in his gut, breaking one of his ribs. He never knew it was there until Doctors noticed it while examining him for a hernia.

A second individual I know retired some years ago and watches a variety of sitcoms, news and documentaries day in and day out. He leaves his house on a very limited basis, living mostly in fear of the outside world. He takes a variety of drugs for depression and anxiety. His pallor is ashen. I can’t help but wonder if his chronic television watching is contributing to his problems.

I also serve individuals who have chronic problems with memory. They have difficulty recalling where they put their keys, issues with dates, times, people’s names, etc. Again, it would be interesting to wean them from television, in addition to Heilkunst Treatment, and see if their etheric memory increases.

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“Television” by Chris Brown

As you can see, television is a toxic, mind-numbing and disease inducing machine. It infects you and your family with its agenda, which represents less than 1% of reality. If you travel the real world, as I do, you’ll realize that 99% of the population is so loving, helpful and compassionate, perhaps you too will forget the violence and fear proffered by television.

I’ve not had television in my midst for over twenty years for the precise reasons that I’ve illustrated above. Living without it means that I get to live my own creative, thought-provoking and imaginative life, full of juicy impressions and healthy desires. I’m a photographer, an artist, a romantic scientist and a philosopher. I get to write books, serve patients and compose blog articles based on my own generative impressions, fully taking the time to ruminate upon ideas as they crystallize into articles. I love my over-the-moon fulfilling life and I feel that T.V. would only detract from desire to know myself and others in a deep and meaningful way.

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Image shared in Instagram by “Berry Sprouts” where you can also find us at “Arcanum Wholistic Clinic”


 

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151027154939.htm

What Did Steiner Say about Television?

https://www.amazon.com/Messages-Body-Psychological-Meaning-Reference/dp/0977206904

Interval Fasting; Shocking Your Monkey To Life

“Shock the monkey
Shock the monkey
Shock the monkey to life”

~ Peter Gabriel

Some of you know that Jeff and I are living in Mexico for the Winter.  It is stunningly beautiful here, warm, and teaming with fresh foods and life.  Everyday we wake early, often walking the beach, biking or swimming for a couple of hours first thing before clinic and work calls.  When we walk, we’re often strolling hand in hand back to our condo, mid-morning, for another swim in the pool, a little sunbathing and a meditation well before lunch.  I feel like a kid who’s having so much fun, I forget to eat!

After being here for almost 2 months, I didn’t notice much that my physical body had changed.  It is hot, so I wear a lot of dresses.  One day, I grabbed a pair of white pants to wear out to dinner.  When I buttoned them up, I noticed several additional inches between me and my waistband.  Odd, I checked the size thinking I might have packed the wrong ones to bring, but no this was the snug pair that I’d brought with me from home.

Not a week later, I was speaking with a patient who’d fully actualized her essential self and was just finishing up her Heilkunst treatment with me.  She mentioned having lost weight recently citing how easily she was letting go.  She was excited to tell me how her daughter, who is a Chef, was the one to have recommended, “The Fast Diet” by a Dr. Michael Mosely and Mimi Spencer.  I didn’t think too much about it as I’m not one much for fads of any sort, however, in the same week, I came across this Ted Talk video with Mark Mattson on fasting and ketosis and wondered at the recent phenomenon I was experiencing.

Interesting to me, as I both love and hate fasting!  I do it full out a couple times a year.  Based on principles of not allowing my body to become so complacent with the influx of cooked or even raw foods, I’ll go to a liquid or mono-food diet for a time to give my body a rest, metabolize hidden islets of toxicity and re-boot the grid with regards to my relationship to food.  I love food, I love to cook and I often need to recall that,”I eat to live, not live to eat!”

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I know that when I’m ready to know a whole concept, the teacher will appear.  In this case, my patient, was the cathartic nudge I needed to figure out why I was naturally and easily dropping weight.  I knew that our foremothers and fathers did not have the food availability that we do in these modern times and that often, they were not eating 3 meals a day due to shortage.

Even when I worked on the family farm, often we’d be out in the fields or milking cows before dawn, coming up to the house around 11:00 a.m. or noon for our main meal.  The table heaped with meat, green beans boiled to well beyond their death in milk and potatoes, always heaps of potatoes.  Then we’d have a smaller supper, usually a sandwich made from the noontime leftovers.  Then you’d fall into bed just after the sun was down, spent and fulfilled within my beloved community.

My kids, even though they were mostly raised on farms, naturally ate the same way.  They would almost always skip breakfast and desire a decent meal around noon and then a snack-like meal again in the early evening or sometimes not at all.  Often, they were easily going over 12 hours without food in their teens as they dictated their own nourishing schedule!  I also noticed that my children, now adults, always self-regulated their diets out of their innate volition. I also knew to trust my kid’s innate rhythms, as they were the healthiest people I had the pleasure of observing through their organic unfolding!
260px-Glycogen_structure.svgI was always curious about society’s expectation that we eat three meals and snacks as it always seemed excessive to me.  The idea of not eating for longer spans of  became clear to me when I read how glycogen gets stored up in the system.  In humans, glycogen is made and stored primarily in the cells of the liver and the muscles hydrated with three or four parts of water. Glycogen functions as the secondary long-term energy storage, with the primary energy stores being fats held in adipose tissue. Muscle glycogen is converted into glucose by muscle cells, and liver glycogen converts to glucose for use throughout the body including the central nervous system.

The glycogen’s function is to lovingly take care of you in instances of fight or flight.  The fast twitch muscles rely on this substance for your reflexes to think and act fast.  On that note, perhaps think of the immediate gratification required by our present society; fast food, fast education crammed into our first 20 years, fast growing crops, fast trades on the stock exchange, children growing up too fast and too soon, fast diagnoses, fast pills and fast sex. Little in our modern world is slow and delicious, as we’re always rushing from one thing to the next.  The armouring in our physical bodies speak to this constant gesture of immediate gratification.

 

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The problem becomes that if you’re eating every couple of hours, you’re not only adding to the sugar in your blood, but you’re also rarely getting to the strata of the fat layers stored beneath the glycogen.   The state of burning fat is termed “ketosis”.  Producing ketones is a desirable state loved by both the kidney and heart, that was formerly controversial by some allopathic scientists.

There is an assumption that if a body is burning a lot of fat for energy, it must not be getting “enough” glucose. However, there is no indication, from studying people on reduced carbohydrate diets, that this is the case.   If you can’t periodically get into ketosis, you end up suffering a physiological vicious circle of fight/flight.  Then, when you grab a latte for lunch en route to an afternoon meeting, you prevent the system from burning fat, sinking into the slow, heat burning furnace we’re capable of.

Many folks are starving from a lack of micro-nutrients, but they’re also superficially cold both physically and emotionally.  This is true for slim individuals too, as folks who are ripped in their musculature are often as armoured as the obese person.  Think of the runners who’ve dropped dead and the finish line or the woman with arthritis so bad in her one hundred fifteen pound frame.  Even Dr. Mercola speaks to the benefits of intermittent fasting and he’s a really lean dude!

 

 

When we do eat it is important to engage consciously, deliberately and prayerfully with our food.  In our culture, we’ve mostly forgotten the art of romance with food and who we are eating with.  Think how nourishing it can feel to eat together with loved ones and while lingering over a bowl of chowder.  My husband, Jeff, when he’s eating something he loves that I’ve prepared will literally moan with each bite, closing his eyes and savouring each proffered chaw.  God, how I love to feed him!

So how to solve our glycogen habit you ask?  First, we have to stop being junkies and then as Peter Gabriel suggests, we’ve got to “shock the monkey!”  First of all cut out the coffee.  Coffee suppresses fear and is a big cause for anxiety and sleep issues in our culture.  Perhaps deal with the underlying cause.  Eat organic fruits and vegetables that resonate with your blood type.  We’ll send you the food lists, or you can check out Dr. D’Adamo’s book, “Eat Right For Your Type“,  and then one to two days a week, you bring your calories down to a mere five hundred for the day.

The idea is that our physiologies are not really designed to eat three meals a day plus snacks.  When was the last time you had to fish, forage or hunt for you food?  When you’re hungry, really hungry, your mind gets sharp, your body brilliantly taut and at the ready to smartly outwit that trout.

Where did the false premise of eating every couple of hours come from? It is promoted by dieticians trained to follow government food guides, which in turn arise from inimical forces in the allopathic medical field who make money on your three meals a day choices. This constant consumption of food contributes to obesity, cancer, high blood pressure and heart disease.

Suppressing our innate drives of creativity and desires for love and intimacy, by mouth, is often the socially acceptable drug of choice for a lot of people.  I’m suggesting that we solve the underlying cause for the angst and pain we suffer instead and stop being so resigned to it; go ahead and shock the monkey! See the stuff that you’re really made of.

This is also the basis for Dr. Mosley and Mimi Spencer’s “The Fast Diet” (although his use of coffee I can’t condone especially for all other blood types except ‘A’).  And, no, that doesn’t mean you’re eating like you’re in a blitz! Think the other kind of “fast,” the spiritual one.  Folks have been fasting for religious reasons for thousands of years.  It is for the purpose of spiritual transformation, getting into the strata of your being-ness, plumbing the depths of your intimate relationship to God.  If you’re an atheist, then just think of how your organs and health will benefit.

On five hundred calorie days, it also means slowly and lovingly savoring a farm-fresh egg and some organic cottage cheese with half a grapefruit perhaps late morning, for example, and then a beautiful little stir-fry early evening.  If you’re wanting to get back to your healthy weight, have clearer thoughts and a healthier body, Mosley suggests engaging thusly on this fast two days per week and if you’re seeking to maintain your health, purging your system of unwanted toxins or islets of organization, then one day a week is sufficient.  It actually is a a lot easier than you might think!  Read the testimonials of folks who’ve let go of hundreds of excess weight at the back of the book.

When I was doing the research for this article, I queried my 18 year old daughter, Adie, who is a natural athlete.  She trains Olympic-level horses and must remain in a state of self-governance with regards to her heath and regimen.

“Adie, what do you do when you feel hungry?”  I heard her pause at the other end of the phone, “Well, I acknowledge the need for a moment and then just let it pass, really.  It’s just hunger, it’s not like I’m going to die or anything.  Often it’s just a call for more water so I drink, or recognize it for what it is and then just let it go or re-engage more deeply with what I’m working on.  I don’t let it dictate my actions as the more I eat, the more food I want.”

I gave a lot of thought to Adie’s words.  It is true that I answered the call for food too often myself.  Even though I’ve naturally purged a dress size or two, I’m going to grab that monkey by the tail and give him a good yank! Also, I NEVER underestimate happiness, beauty, the beach and good geography for allowing a gal to simply let go.

“Cover me when I run
Cover me through the fire
Something knocked me out ‘ the trees
Now I’m on my knees
Cover me, darling please
Monkey, monkey, monkey
Don’t you know you’re going to shock the monkey”

~ Peter Gabriel

 

Sources:

http://www.collective-evolution.com/2015/12/11/neuroscientist-shows-what-fasting-does-to-your-brain-why-big-pharma-wont-study-it/

http://fitness.mercola.com/sites/fitness/archive/2013/06/28/intermittent-fasting-health-benefits.aspx

 

 

Childhood, disrupted

An excellent article, published on Aeon on how childhood trauma manifests as physical disease later on:

Adversity in childhood can create long-lasting scars, damaging our cells and our DNA, and making us sick as adults

by Donna Jackson Nakazawa

 

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Photo by Charles Gullung/Gallery Stock

 

If you saw Laura walking down the New York City street where she lives today, you’d see a well-dressed 46-year-old woman with auburn hair and green eyes, who exudes a sense of ‘I matter here.’ She looks entirely in charge of her life, but behind Laura’s confident demeanour lies a history of trauma: a bipolar mother who vacillated between braiding her daughter’s hair and peppering her with insults, and a father who moved out-of-state with his wife-to-be when Laura was 15 years old.

She recalls a family trip to the Grand Canyon when she was 10. In a photo taken that day, Laura and her parents sit on a bench, sporting tourist whites. ‘Anyone looking at us would have assumed that we were a normal, loving family.’ But as they put on fake smiles for the camera, Laura’s mother suddenly pinched her daughter’s midriff and told her to stop ‘staring off into space’. A second pinch: ‘No wonder you’re turning into a butterball, you ate so much cheesecake last night you’re hanging over your shorts!’ If you look hard at Laura’s face in the photograph, you can see that she’s not squinting at the Arizona sun, but holding back tears.

After her father left the family, he sent cards and money, but called less and less. Meanwhile, her mother’s untreated bipolar disorder worsened. Sometimes, Laura says: ‘My mom would go on a vitriolic diatribe about my dad until spittle foamed on her chin. I’d stand there, trying not to hear her as she went on and on, my whole body shaking inside.’ Laura never invited friends over, for fear they’d find out her secret: her mom ‘wasn’t like other moms’.

Some 30 years later, Laura says: ‘In many ways, no matter where I go or what I do, I’m still in my mother’s house.’ Today, ‘If a car swerves into my lane, a grocery store clerk is rude, my husband and I argue, or my boss calls me in to talk over a problem, I feel something flip over inside. It’s like there’s a match standing inside too near a flame, and with the smallest breeze, it ignites.’

To see Laura, you’d never know that she is ‘always shaking a little, only invisibly, deep down in my cells’.

Her sense that something is wrong inside is mirrored by her physical health. During a routine exam, Laura’s doctor discovered that Laura was suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy and would require a cardioverter defibrillator to keep her heart pumping. The two-inch scar from her surgery only hints at the more severe scars she hides from her childhood.

For as long as John can remember, he says, his parents’ marriage was deeply troubled, as was his relationship with his father. ‘I consider myself to have been raised by my mom and her mom. I longed to feel a deeper connection with my dad, but it just wasn’t there. He couldn’t extend himself in that way.’ John’s poor relationship with his father was due, in large part, to his father’s reactivity and need for control. For instance, if John’s father said that the capital of New York was New York City, there was just no use telling him that it was Albany.

As John got older, it seemed wrong to him that his father ‘was constantly pointing out all the mistakes that my brother and I made, without acknowledging any of his own’. His father relentlessly criticised his mother, who was ‘kinder and more confident’. Aged 12, John began to interject himself into the fights between his parents. He remembers one Christmas Eve, when he found his father with his hands around his mother’s neck and had to separate them. ‘I was always trying to be the adult between them,’ John says.

John is now a boyish 40, with warm hazel eyes and a wide, affable grin. But beneath his easy, open demeanour, he struggles with an array of chronic illnesses. By the time he was 33, his blood pressure was shockingly high; he began to experience bouts of stabbing stomach pain and diarrhoea and often had blood in his stool; he struggled from headaches almost daily. By 34, he’d developed chronic fatigue, and was so wiped out that he sometimes struggled to make it through an entire workday.

John’s relationships, like his body, were never completely healthy. He ended a year?long romance with a woman he deeply loved because he felt riddled with anxiety around her normal, ‘happy family’. He just didn’t know how to fit in. ‘She wanted to help,’ he says, ‘but instead of telling her how insecure I was around her, I told her I wasn’t in love with her.’ Bleeding from his inflamed intestines, exhausted by chronic fatigue, debilitated and distracted by pounding headaches, often struggling with work, and unable to feel comfortable in a relationship, John was stuck in a universe of pain and solitude, and he couldn’t get out.

Laura’s and John’s life stories illustrate the physical price we can pay, as adults, for trauma that took place 10, 20, even 30 years ago. New findings in neuroscience, psychology and immunology tell us that the adversity we face during childhood has farther-reaching consequences than we might ever have imagined. Today, in labs across the country, neuroscientists are peering into the once-inscrutable brain-body connection, and breaking down, on a biochemical level, exactly how the stress we experience during childhood and adolescence catches up with us when we are adults, altering our bodies, our cells, and even our DNA.

Emotional stress in adult life affects us on a physical level in quantifiable, life-altering ways. We all know that when we are stressed, chemicals and hormones can flush our body and increase levels of inflammation. That’s why stressful events in adult life are correlated with the likelihood of getting a cold or having a heart attack.

But when children or teens face adversity and especially unpredictable stressors, they are left with deeper, longer?lasting scars. When the young brain is thrust into stressful situations over and over again without warning, and stress hormones are repeatedly ramped up, small chemical markers, known as methyl groups, adhere to specific genes that regulate the activity of stress?hormone receptors in the brain. These epigenetic changes hamper the body’s ability to turn off the stress response. In ideal circumstances, a child learns to respond to stress, and recover from it, learning resilience. But kids who’ve faced chronic, unpredictable stress undergo biological changes that cause their inflammatory stress response to stay activated.

Joan Kaufman, director of the Child and Adolescent Research and Education (CARE) programme at the Yale School of Medicine, recently analysed DNA in the saliva of happy, healthy children, and of children who had been taken from abusive or neglectful parents. The children who’d experienced chronic childhood stress showed epigenetic changes in almost 3,000 sites on their DNA, and on all 23 chromosomes – altering how appropriately they would be able to respond to and rebound from future stressors.

Kids who’ve had early adversity have a drip of fight-or-flight hormones turned on every day – it’s as if there is no off switch

Likewise, Seth Pollak, professor of psychology and director of the Child Emotion Research Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, uncovered startling genetic changes in children with a history of adversity and trauma. Pollak identified damage to a gene responsible for calming the stress response. This particular gene wasn’t working properly; the kids’ bodies weren’t able to reign in their heightened stress response. ‘A crucial set of brakes are off,’ says Pollak.

Imagine for a moment that your body receives its stress hormones and chemicals through an IV drip that’s turned on high when needed and, when the crisis passes, it’s switched off again. You might think of kids whose brains have undergone epigenetic changes because of early adversity as having an inflammation-promoting drip of fight-or-flight hormones turned on every day – it’s as if there is no off switch.

Experiencing stress in childhood changes your set point of wellbeing for decades to come. In people such as Laura and John, the endocrine and immune systems are churning out a damaging and inflammatory cocktail of stress neurochemicals in response to even small stressors – an unexpected bill, a disagreement with their spouse, a car that swerves in front of them on the highway, a creak on the staircase – for the rest of their lives. They might find themselves overreacting to, and less able to recover from, the inevitable stressors of life. They’re always responding. And all the while, they’re unwittingly marinating in inflammatory chemicals, which sets the stage for full-throttle disease down the road, in the form of autoimmune disease, heart disease, cancer, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, fibroid tumours, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcers, migraines and asthma.

Scientists first came to understand the relationship between early chronic stress and later adult disease through the work of a dedicated physician in San Diego and a determined epidemiologist from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. Together, during the 1980s and ’90s – the years when Laura and John were growing up – these two researchers began a paradigm-shifting public-health investigation known as the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study.

In 1985, Vincent J Felitti, chief of a revolutionary preventive care initiative at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care programme in San Diego, noticed a startling pattern in adult patients at an obesity clinic. A significant number were, with the support of Felitti and his nurses, successfully losing hundreds of pounds a year, a remarkable feat, only to withdraw from the programme despite weight-loss success. Felitti, determined to get to the bottom of the attrition rate, conducted face-to-face interviews with 286 patients. It turned out there was a common denominator. Many confided that they had suffered some sort of trauma, often sexual abuse, in their childhoods. To these patients, eating was a solution, not a problem: it soothed the anxiety and depression they had harboured for decades; their weight served as a shield against undesired attention, and they didn’t want to let it go.

Felitti’s interviews gave him a new way of looking at human health and wellbeing that other physicians just weren’t seeing. He presented his findings at a national obesity conference, arguing that ‘our intractable public health problems’ had root causes hidden ‘by shame, by secrecy, and by social taboos against exploring certain areas of life experience’. Felitti’s peers were quick to blast him. One even stood up in the audience and accused Felitti of offering ‘excuses’ for patients’ ‘failed lives’. Felitti, however, remained unfazed; he felt sure that he had stumbled upon a piece of information that would hold enormous import for the field of medicine.

After a colleague who attended that same conference suggested that he design a study with thousands of patients who suffered from a wide variety of diseases, not just obesity, Felitti joined forces with Robert Anda, a medical epidemiologist at the CDC who had, at the time, been researching the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression. Felitti and Anda took advantage of Kaiser Permanente’s vast patient cohort to set up a national epidemiology laboratory. Of the 26,000 patients they invited to take part in their study, more than 17,000 agreed.

Anda and Felitti surveyed these 17,000 individuals on about 10 types of adversity, or adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), probing into patients’ childhood and adolescent histories. Questions included: ‘Was a biological parent ever lost to you through divorce, abandonment or other reason?’; ‘Did a parent or other adult in the household often swear at you, insult you, put you down or humiliate you?’; and ‘Was a household member depressed or mentally ill?’ Other questions looked at types of family dysfunction that included growing up with a parent who was an alcoholic or addicted to other substances; being physically or emotionally neglected; being sexually or physically abused; witnessing domestic violence; having a family member who was sent to prison; feeling that there was no one to provide protection; and feeling that one’s family didn’t look out for each other. For each category to which a patient responded ‘yes’, one point would be added to her ACE score, so an ACE score of 2 would indicate that she had suffered two adverse childhood experiences.

To be clear, the patients Felitti and Anda surveyed were not troubled or disadvantaged; the average patient was 57, and three-quarters had attended college. These were ‘successful’ men and women, mostly white, middle-class, with stable jobs and health benefits. Felitti and Anda expected their number of ‘yes’ answers to be fairly low.

The correlation between having a difficult childhood and facing illness as an adult offered a whole new lens through which we could view human health and disease

When the results came in, Felitti and Anda were shocked: 64 per cent of participants answered ‘yes’ to having encountered at least one category of early adversity, and 87 per cent of those patients also had additional adverse childhood experiences; 40 per cent had suffered two or more ACEs; 12.5 per cent had an ACE score greater than or equal to 4.

Felitti and Anda wanted to find out whether there was a correlation between the number of adverse childhood experiences an individual had faced, and the number and severity of illnesses and disorders she developed as an adult. The correlation proved so powerful that Anda was not only ‘stunned’, but deeply moved.

‘I wept,’ he says. ‘I saw how much people had suffered, and I wept.’

Felitti, too, was deeply affected. ‘Our findings exceeded anything we had conceived. The correlation between having a difficult childhood and facing illness as an adult offered a whole new lens through which we could view human health and disease.’

Here, says Felitti, ‘was the missing piece as to what was causing so much of our unspoken suffering as human beings’.

The number of adverse childhood experiences a patient had suffered could by and large predict the amount of medical care she would require in adulthood: the higher the ACE score, the higher the number of doctor’s appointments she’d had in the past year, and the more unexplained physical symptoms she’d reported.

People with an ACE score of 4 were twice as likely to be diagnosed with cancer than people who hadn’t faced any form of childhood adversity. For each point an individual had, her chance of being hospitalised with an autoimmune disease in adulthood rose 20 per cent. Someone with an ACE score of 4 was 460 per cent more likely to face depression than someone with a score of 0.

An ACE score of 6 or higher shortened an individual’s lifespan by almost 20 years.

Researchers wondered if those who encountered childhood adversity were also more likely to smoke, drink and overeat as a sort of coping strategy, and while that was sometimes the case, unhealthy habits didn’t wholly account for the correlation Felitti and Anda saw between adverse childhood experiences and later illness. For instance, those with ACE scores greater than or equal to 7 who didn’t drink or smoke, weren’t overweight or diabetic, and didn’t have high cholesterol stillhad a 360 per cent higher risk of heart disease than those with ACE scores of 0.

‘Time,’ says Felitti, ‘does not heal all wounds. One does not “just get over” something – not even 50 years later.’ Instead, he says: ‘Time conceals. And human beings convert traumatic emotional experiences in childhood into organic disease later in life.’

Often, these illnesses can be chronic and lifelong. Autoimmune disease. Heart disease. Chronic bowel disorders. Migraines. Persistent depression. Even today, doctors puzzle over these very conditions: why are they so prevalent; why are some patients more prone to them than others; and why are they so difficult to treat?

The more research that’s done, the more granular details emerge about the profound link between adverse experiences and adult disease. Scientists at Duke University in North Carolina, the University of California, San Francisco, and Brown University in Rhode Island have shown that childhood adversity damages us on a cellular level in ways that prematurely age our cells and affect our longevity. Adults who faced early life stress show greater erosion in what are known as telomeres – protective caps that sit on the ends of DNA strands to keep the DNA healthy and intact. As telomeres erode, we’re more likely to develop disease, and we age faster; as our telomeres age and expire, our cells expire and so, eventually, do we.

Researchers have also seen a correlation between specific types of adverse childhood experiences and a range of diseases. For instance, children whose parents die, or who face emotional or physical abuse, or experience childhood neglect, or witness marital discord between their parents are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, lung disease, diabetes, headaches, multiple sclerosis and lupus as adults. Facing difficult circumstances in childhood increases six-fold your chances of having myalgic encephalomyelitis (chronic fatigue syndrome) as an adult. Kids who lose a parent have triple the risk of depression in their lifetimes. Children whose parents divorce are twice as likely to suffer a stroke later down the line.

Laura and John’s stories illustrate that the past can tick away inside us for decades like a silent time bomb, until it sets off a cellular message that lets us know the body does not forget its history.

Something that happened to you when you were five or 15 can land you in the hospital 30 years later

John’s ACE score would be a 3: a parent often put him down; he witnessed his mother being harmed; and, clearly, his father suffered from an undiagnosed behaviour health disorder, perhaps narcissism or depression, or both.

Laura had an ACE score of 4.

Laura and John are hardly alone. Two-thirds of American adults are carrying wounds from childhood quietly into adulthood, with little or no idea of the extent to which these wounds affect their daily health and wellbeing. Something that happened to you when you were five or 15 can land you in the hospital 30 years later, whether that something was headline news, or happened quietly, without anyone else knowing it, in the living room of your childhood home.

The adversity a child faces doesn’t have to be severe abuse in order to create deep biophysical changes that can lead to chronic health conditions in adulthood.

‘Our findings showed that the 10 different types of adversity we examined were almost equal in their damage,’ says Felitti. He and Anda found that no single ACE significantly trumped another. This was true even though some types, such as being sexually abused, are far worse in that society regards them as particularly shameful, and others, such as physical abuse, are more overt in their violence.

This makes sense if you think about how the stress response functions on an optimal level. You meet a bear in the woods, and your body floods with adrenaline and cortisol so that you can quickly decide whether to run in the opposite direction or stay and try to frighten the bear. After you deal with the crisis, you recover, your stress hormones abate, and you go home with a great story. For Laura and John, though, that feeling that the bear is still out there, somewhere, circling in the woods, stalking, and might strike again any day, anytime – that feeling never disappears.

There are a lot of bears out there. Chronic parental discord; enduring low-dose humiliation or blame and shame; chronic teasing; the quiet divorce between two secretly seething parents; a parent’s premature exit from a child’s life; the emotional scars of growing up with a hypercritical, unsteady, narcissistic, bipolar, alcoholic, addicted or depressed parent; physical or emotional abuse or neglect: these happen in all too many families. Although the details of individual adverse experiences differ from one home to another and from one neighbourhood to another, they are all precursors to the same organic chemical changes deep in the gray matter of the developing brain.

Every few decades, a groundbreaking psychosocial ‘theory of everything’ helps us to develop a new understanding of why we are the way we are – and how we got that way. In the early 20th century, the psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud transformed the landscape of psychology when he argued that the unconscious rules much of our waking life and dreams. Jungian theory taught, among other ideas, that we tend toward introversion or extroversion, which led the American educationalist Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers to develop a personality indicator. More recently, neuroscientists discovered that age ‘zero to three’ was a critical synaptic window for brain development, giving birth to Head Start and other preschool programmes. The correlation between childhood trauma, brain architecture and adult wellbeing is the newest, and perhaps our most important, psychobiological theory of everything.

Today’s research on adverse childhood experiences revolutionises how we see ourselves, our understanding of how we came to be the way we are, why we love the way we do, how we can better nurture our children, and how we can work to realise our potential.

To date, more than 1,500 studies founded on Felitti and Anda’s hallmark ACE research show that both physical and emotional suffering are rooted in the complex workings of the immune system, the body’s master operating control centre – and what happens to the brain during childhood sets the programming for how our immune systems will respond for the rest of our lives.

The unifying principle of this new theory of everything is this: your emotional biography becomes your physical biology, and together, they write much of the script for how you will live your life. Put another way: your early stories script your biology and your biology scripts the way your life will play out.

Unlike previous theories of everything, though, this one has been mind-bogglingly slow to change how we do medicine, according to Felitti. ‘Very few internists or medical schools are interested in embracing the added responsibility that this understanding imposes on them.’

With the ACE research now available, we might hope that physicians will begin to see patients as a holistic sum of their experiences and embrace the understanding that a stressor from long ago can be a health-risk time bomb that has exploded. Such a medical paradigm, which sees adverse childhood experiences as one of many key factors that can play a role in disease, could save many patients years in the healing process.

But seeing that connection takes a little time. It means asking patients to fill out the ACE questionnaire and delving into that patient’s history for insight into sources of both physical and emotional pain. As health-care budgets have become stretched, physicians spend less time interacting one-on-one with patients in their exam rooms; the average physician schedules patients back-to-back at 15-minute intervals.

Still, the cost of not intervening is far greater – not only in the loss of human health and wellbeing, but also in additional healthcare. According to the CDC, the total lifetime cost of child maltreatment in the US is $124 billion each year. The lifetime healthcare cost for each individual who experiences childhood maltreatment is estimated at $210,012 – comparable to other costly health conditions, such as having a stroke, which has a lifetime estimated cost of $159,846 per person, or type-2 diabetes, which is estimated to cost between $181,000 and $253,000.

Further hindering change is the fact that adult physical medicine and psychological medicine remain in separate silos. Utilising ACE research requires breaking down these long-standing divisions in healthcare between what is ‘physical’ and what is ‘mental’ or ‘emotional,’ and that’s hard to achieve. Physicians have been well-trained to deal only with what they can touch with their hands, see with their eyes, or view with microscopes or scans.

Just as physical wounds and bruises heal, just as we can regain our muscle tone, we can recover function in underconnected areas of the brain

However, now that we have scientific evidence that the brain is genetically modified by childhood experience, we can no longer draw that line in the sand. With hundreds of studies showing that childhood adversity hurts our mental and physical health, putting us at greater risk for learning disorders, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disease, depression, obesity, suicide, substance abuse, failed relationships, violence, poor parenting and early death, we just can’t afford to make such distinctions.

Science tells us that biology does not have to be destiny. ACEs can last a lifetime, but they don’t have to. Just as physical wounds and bruises heal, just as we can regain our muscle tone, we can recover function in underconnected areas of the brain. If anything, that’s the most important take-away from ACE research: the brain and body are never static; they are always in the process of becoming and changing.

Even if we have been set on high-reactive mode for decades or a lifetime, we can still dial it down. We can respond to life’s inevitable stressors more appropriately and shift away from an overactive inflammatory response. We can become neurobiologically resilient. We can turn bad epigenetics into good epigenetics and rescue ourselves. We have the capacity, within ourselves, to create better health. We might call this brave undertaking ‘the neurobiology of awakening’.

Today, scientists recognise a range of promising approaches to help create new neurons (known as neurogenesis), make new synaptic connections between those neurons (known as synaptogenesis), promote new patterns of thoughts and reactions, bring underconnected areas of the brain back online – and reset our stress response so that we decrease the inflammation that makes us ill.

You can find ways to start right where you are, no matter how deep your scars or how long ago they occurred. Many mind-body therapies not only help you to calm your thoughts and increase your emotional and physical wellbeing, but research suggests that they have the potential to reverse, on a biological level, the harmful impact of childhood adversity.

Recent studies indicate that individuals who practice mindfulness meditation and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) show an increase in gray matter in parts of the brain associated with managing stress, and experience shifts in genes that regulate their stress response and their levels of inflammatory hormones. Other research suggests that a process known as neurofeedback can help to regrow connections in the brain that were lost to adverse childhood experiences.

Meditation, mindfulness, neurofeedback, cognitive therapy, EMDR (eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing) therapy: these promising new avenues to healing can be part of any patient’s recovery plan, if only healthcare practitioners would begin to treat the whole patient – past, present and future, without making distinctions between physical and mental health – and encourage patients to explore all the treatment options available to them. The more we learn about the toxic impact of early stress, the better equipped we are to counter its effects, and help to uncover new strategies and modalities to come back to who it is we really are, and who it was we might have been had we not encountered childhood adversity in the first place.

This is an adapted and reprinted extract from ‘Childhood Disrupted: How Your Biography Becomes Your Biology, and How You Can Heal’ (Atria), by Donna Jackson Nakazawa. Copyright © Donna Jackson Nakazawa, 2015.

Medhorrinum; Bursting Forth In Manic Extremes!

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My Medhorrinum story from this morning!

I was on my way to my fitness class this morning and the instructor and I bumped into each other in the hall. She cited that she felt frazzled after visiting her adult daughter. She raced on to tell me that her daughter has a very large pocket of fat on her upper arm that is currently inflamed, bleeding and draining pus (sorry). She cited that she guesses that her daughter will need to go for surgery to have the mass removed. I just stood quietly as she went on to describe how her daughter is often all over the place, living from a “place of extremes” as she is frantically searching for a new home.

At this point, I explained how she’d dropped a number of very clear clues as to the root cause of her daughter’s physical and mental ills.  I let her know that the Genetic Miasm, Medhorrinum, corresponds to Spring where you’ll see eruptions like tumours, fatty deposits, ganglions, warts, right sided earaches, etc. I went on to describe the individual as hurried and often operating manically, out of gestures of extremes. Their highs and lows range from mania to depression. The problem is that if you mechanistically cut out the abscessing fatty deposit, you do nothing to address the underlying cause; the state of mind. It will just be a matter of time before the symptoms find another way to express themselves in more raucous displays of sycosis. I also let her know that, over time, the issues can show up as glaucoma, arthritis, asthma, sinusitis, heart disease and stroke.

I then let it go and joined the others in the class. I had a copy of my book, “The Path To Cure,” in the car and I left this with her. Perhaps I’ll have the pleasure of meeting her daughter and helping to start to shrink that fatty deposit on her arm after we address the weeping (Pyrogenium, Phosphorous, Calendula). Simultaneously, I know that she will also begin to feel calmer, executing her desires with more ease and grace. The other great thing is that we’d shut down the predisposition for the disease to exhibit multiple pathic off-shoots that could sadly arrest her longevity over time.

The Wisdom In Your Wisdom Teeth!

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I often say to patients, “God doesn’t just download us with spare parts.”  Folks who just have their spleen, gallbladder or wisdom teeth removed aren’t always hooked into the deeper functioning of these organs on our behalf.  If they knew, they’d actively take more of a stand to protect their God-given body, and all it’s parts and address the root of their problems instead.

For example, a person can remove their gallbladder, however, they’ve not addressed why they’re suffering issues in the organ that is simply storing anger and resentment.  The underlying cause has not been dealt with outright and will  simply manifest in another way.   Also, physiologically speaking, the gallbladder can quite easily  flushed, without surgery using Dr. Hulda Clark’s protocols restoring your digestion and overall health.

The spleen, as per Rudolf Steiner, is a mediating organ between our biological humanness and our spiritual consciousness.  In order to eat food harvested from the earth and have that foodstuff convert into thought, you need a spleen on board to transmute these physical processes into thinking. The spleen is also an organ that promotes our individuality. This is why many mechanistic thinking Allopathic Physicians will say that the purpose of the spleen has not be determined.  Just because they don’t know the reason for why we have a spleen does not make it conscionable to remove it without first addressing the root cause without causing harm.  This is where Heilkunst principles come in.

The same goes for our wisdom teeth.  Curiously they’re named thusly due to the fact that they emerge in our wisdom years,  later in life around our late teens or early 20’s; long after the tooth fairy has retired her crown, wand and purse.  According to Chinese Medicine, all teeth have a function, including our wisdom teeth, and if you just extract them without the knowledge of their deeper function you could cause major issues in the body’s circulation, more specifically the heart, middle ear, shoulder, pituitary functioning, nervous system, tongue and tonsils (another organ often declared surplus but is the first gate for our proper immune functioning).

 

 

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 Dental Chart courtesy of François Jooste, Wholistic Pharmacist

 

The belief is that wisdom teeth are superfluous, that they should be extracted at a younger age before they cause issues later on.  The thing is that they don’t generally cause issues later on in healthy individuals even if they are so called “impacted” or lying on an angle like one of my own patients as illustrated in this x-ray here:

 

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Mental note: Those gamma x-rays will need to be addressed for that patient at their next appointment.

 

When we think more wholistic-ally, we realize that practices like filling teeth with composite before the person gets fillings, or extracting wisdom teeth when they’re clearly not bothering the patient is unethical.  This is not preventative medicine at it’s best, as it is clear that harm is being caused by breaking the flow in the acupuncture meridians in the body.

Dr. Brand, a holistic dentist in New York who still has her own wisdom teeth, cites,”Wisdom teeth, specifically, are connected to the heart and intestine meridians. Is it no wonder that chronic illness in both of these organs are on the rise? Of course there may be other contributing factors to these chronic health issues, such as diet, but wisdom teeth extractions, as well as the residual cavitations at the extraction site, may also be contributing to these systemic health conditions.  It is also not uncommon to have some ear issues (hearing problems, vertigo) or even nerve damage (paraesthesia) after wisdom tooth extraction.”

This is why we’re fairly adamant that if you’re not suffering pain, there is no reason to just randomly remove your wisdom teeth.  If you’re unsure, just get a second opinion from a biological dentist who is highly recommended and only acts out of ethical necessity.

If you feel it absolutely necessary to have those Wisdom teeth removed, then be sure to clear the multi-layered trauma with homeopathic nosodes for the physical, including the nerve damage, anaesthetic, and mental trauma.   It would also be best to also clear the timeline traumas and Genetic Miams to prevent the issues cited above from becoming issues in future.

This is why the Heilkunst approach is so effective: all aspects of the whole being and their environment are considered in their treatment.

 

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“A very important aspect of this book is the discussion on how our own mental and physical state affects our pet’s health. We have all witnessed a pet’s ability to empathize. My rather large English Bull Terrier was famous for cuddling up (preferably on your lap) when a family member was upset. But what we need to understand is that their response to our well being goes beyond transitory sympathy. The actual depth to which they take on our issues is truly astonishing, potentially leading to their failing health, and must be addressed if we are to give our pets the best opportunity for health and vitality.

 

This is why the Heilkunst approach is so effective: all aspects of the whole being and their environment are considered in their treatment. Having worked in health care for many years, I know I cannot effectively provide lasting relief to someone by isolating one aspect of their life (e.g. pain) from another (e.g. emotions). The disconnect leaves too much room for the presenting problem to recur. The Heilkunst approach understands and addresses this vital synergistic connection so that the patient, whether human or furry, can flourish.”

 

 

Catherine J. M. Diodati, B.A., M.A., R.M.P.

Author: Immunization: History, Ethics, Law and Health

Vaccine Guide for Dogs and Cats: What Every Pet Lover Should Know

 

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Kathryn’s Cure: How A Congenital Heart Issue Was Resolved With Heilkunst

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“My oldest daughter, Kathryn, was born with the same congenital heart defect that I was born with. We were both born with an ASD, atrial septal defect. Mine required surgery when I was seven years old. Kathryn’s was detected when she was less than a year old and we were told by cardiologists that due to the large size of the hole in her heart (8 mm) that there was no chance of it closing on its own and that it should be repaired before she reached the age of three. Additionally, through the first year of Kathryn’s life she dealt with severe cases of eczema, reflux and allergies, which lead to poor eating and sleeping habits.

Fortunately, we were referred to Allyson and her Arcanum Wholistic practice by some friends we made when we moved to Ottawa. We originally met with Allyson to see if she could help with the eczema, reflux and allergies, not thinking that she could possibly do anything about the hole in our daughter’s heart. To our disbelief Allyson told us that she could in fact repair the hole in her heart through proper diagnosis and remedies. The next time we met with our cardiologist, approximately six months later, he informed us that the hole had shrunk from 8 mm to 4 mm. He was genuinely surprised as he had never seen an ASD’s the size of Kathryn’s ever repair itself. He told us that we could now put off any operations on her heart until she was older. We continued to meet with Allyson and received remedies from her.

A few weeks ago we went back to the cardiologist for her bi-annual check-up. After an extensive echo-cardiogram and EKG it was determined that the ASD was entirely gone! There was no sign of it ever existing. The doctor was in disbelief and had no explanation for us other than he would like to follow up a year later to make sure that the hole was permanently gone.

What a relief it is for us to not have to have our daughter under go an extensive and dangerous invasive procedure to surgically repair this problem. Allyson correctly diagnosed and treated Kathryn in a purely natural manner and we can’t thank her enough. Kathryn has also had considerable improvement with her eczema, reflux and allergies. We will continue to meet with Allyson and follow her “path to cure.””

Greg

 

Learn more on how to use natural remedies at home with your children from our best-seller:

 

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Armoring of the Thoracic Segment

This blog is part of a series; its original title was Heilkunst Basics : University, 3rd Year (Armoring of the Thoracic Segment)

The thoracic (or chest) segment is a big crossroads in our system, where many of the processes of our upper self meet and mingle with those of our nether self. In Anthroposophical terms, this is the home of our rhythmic system, which is the mediator between our nerve-sense and metabolic-limb systems. If you think of the top listed causes of death, you’ll see that both the heart and lungs seem to take the brunt of life’s stressors, and can be the first to go.

When looking at the thoracic segment from a more strictly orgonomic perspective, it is important to note up front that one of the primary mechanisms in armoring is what Reich called the “chronic inspiratory attitude”. The chest, and more specifically, the lungs are the seat of this defunct breathing pattern which many people don’t even notice that they fall into continually.

Some other physical indicators of an armored chest segment can include a posture of hunching over, as if in protection of the vulnerable heart and emotions. Conversely, there can be the opposite form of defense, which is a compensated posture showing over-confidence. More severe breathing difficulties, such as asthma-like conditions are also included here. The patient, themselves, may report a feeling or sensation of heaviness in their heart, or it may be observed by their general attitude in life. Any suppressed sobbing is stored in this segment. (Whereas suppressed tears are more related to the ocular segment, for example, and the root of sinus headaches).

The thoracic cavity is also directly connected with the arms, and with all of the emotional actions they take, such as reaching out (as in the feeling of ‘longing’), or the opposite gesture of punching in anger.

The modalities of treatment will vary with the needs in the moment of the patient, and may include : punching a pillow or punching bag; reaching out towards an imagined object or person of desire; breathing exercises, working towards a full and deep respiration; the homeopathic remedy aurum to release the feeling of heaviness in the heart; pressing on the patient’s chest to help them fully exhale while breathing.

Eggs – Another Minefield of a Myth

This blog is part of a series; its original title was Heilkunst Basics: Grade Eight; Pop Quiz!

I guess it shouldn’t surprise me, but it did — just a couple of days after I warned you about the minefield of myths you need to carefully navigate on your way to health, The Atlantic published an article about a very poorly run study which came to the faulty conclusion that eating eggs is bad for you, in the name of the cholesterol myth. Do you remember the warning I gave you about agents of the pharmaceutical industry trying to sell you the need for drugs, on the basis of the cholesterol myth?

The study quoted in this article is a terrific example of the concept of “believing is seeing” — the researchers began with the presumption of the cholesterol myth, namely, that:

  1. Cholesterol is “bad” for us, and
  2. Consumption of cholesterol-rich foods (such as eggs) raise our cholesterol levels, and are therefore “bad” for us.

Both of these presumptions are false, but once a ‘scientist’ has firmly grabbed hold of a belief, it’s almost impossible to get them to drop it.

As you can see at the bottom of this article online, almost 100% of the commentators (at least at the time I read the article) were very unimpressed with this, and some good points were made there, including:

  • This was merely an observational study, without any proper controls as part of the design.
  • The research begin with a presumption, which automatically makes for a bad research design. One key example : the presumption that consumption of dietary cholesterol increases our cholesterol levels.
  • The study relied on a very poor sample (already sick people in the hospital), and a very weak data collection method relying on recall of past behaviour.

I know that you know better, but it angers me to think of how many people will read this headline, and how it will reinforce the myth that’s already been drilled into their head by the media.

Save an artery today! Feed your friend an egg! Let’s make sure that the yolk is on the pharmaceutical industry, whose sale of Statin drugs dries up along with the rest of their health and nutrition myths.

The Chthonic Realm : Arnica

Arnica is probably the most well known homeopathic remedy, and is used very frequently for day-to-day first aid situations, including bumps and bruises in children, as well as all forms of sports injuries, or even general states of exhaustion, particularly from over-exertion. It is also the primary remedy used to assist in the recovery from, and after-effects of heart attacks or strokes.

Aside from these common physical symptoms, Arnica is also one of the key remedies in the Chthonic Realm, and works at a level in parallel with Belladonna, as they both represent functional blockages of the physical body. Going into this deeper level of Arnica, we discover a fear of being penetrated, either literally or metaphorically. The first aid use of this remedy in cases of shock extends into this deeper theme, where we find individuals who either have an extreme aversion to physical touch, or with making emotional contact with others. This can emerge from a degree of armoring which has been created in order to keep anything or anyone from getting inside, and may sometimes manifest physically, particularly in women who have symptoms of pain upon intercourse, or a generalized aversion to contact. These are the victims of “the war of love”, who exist in a perpetual state of post-traumatic stress disorder.

At all levels, they may behave as solitary heroes, in a relentless pursuit of completing a job or project, and who keep pushing themselves beyond their limits as they can never concede to needing help, or surrendering to the impossibility of their task. Deep states of physical and/or mental exhaustion may often be the condition, in which someone in this state will be found.