Women’s Work; How To Lessen The Burden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the kids were still at home, we had a couple of systems that worked well as we had two busy practices, both of us were doing post graduate research and we had a farm to also run. Basic stuff had to get done, but I was unwilling to be the sacrificial lady lamb in the equation. Jeff, also, would not allow this to happen to me, either, so we developed some basic systems.

Every week we had a white board on the fridge and the four of us would divvy up the chores to be done that week, listed for each day. We also had laundry folding parties where everyone would meet in the living room, the clean laundry spilt out of the baskets onto the floor and then everyone would help sort by pitching undies, shirts, pants etc. at each other until it all got distributed. Great hand-eye coordination and memory work with this one! Each person had their own basket to fold (or gather) their clean clothes into and then put them away in their drawers or closet.

If the kids needed help, they would ask as we buddied up when one child was smaller and more challenged with the task at hand, but they were generally part of the sorting party by the time they were 4 and running the washer and dryer by 12. Sometimes their clean clothes lived in that basket until they got to the bottom, but it had to be kept in their closet. It was their choice as long as it was “put away.”

The other thing that helped a lot is that we had going was a shared grocery/general shopping list app on our phones divided into categories like “market,” “grocery store” or “hardware store.” If stuff needed to get on the list, like ‘cheese’ the child had to use our phones to load it on there or it wouldn’t get bought. Over time, they both got better at spelling these items … but often either Jeff or I would be standing in the grocery isle laughing ourselves silly as Jordan got good at writing items like, “monkey balls” or “penis pickles.”

When they were in their teens, they had the same shared list on their own phones and then when they drove, they also did the groceries. Yay! We helped to grow them into these shared roles from the time that they were little. They were also taught how to manage bills, make payments, and budget accordingly. Now, we’re showing them how to invest in ways that yield solid returns.

The idea was/is to make it fun, there was always some joking around, and the burden was never all on my shoulders to be the Queen-pin of our domestic operations. We also divvied up the cooking and everyone took a night or two preparing supper for the family. We ate a lot of the same things and our crock pot got a lot of use. Sundays, we’d get some music on, Adie would often bake (her Scottish shortbreads to die for), I’d prepare one meal, Jeff another and Jordan would be designated sous chef or dishwasher. The key was that we worked together at all of it … including mucking out the stalls in the barn. It built a sense of teamwork and belonging. A dull knife and a carrot can keep a toddler busy for quite awhile!

In our practice, we see a lot of women chronically in a Sepia state (the careworn mother) or Cancer state (rescuing others to the exclusion of self) of mind.  It is important to activate the health and well-being of our essential selves so as not to default to this program often wrought by our fore-mothers.  Trying to work full-time and/or homeschool and then also deal with all of the responsibilities of hearth and home (or farm) can start out as protracted stress and then become, over time, Sepia or Cancer states qualifying you for more aggressive treatments.  Is it time to wake from your resignation?

 

 

Here’s the original article, by Lisa Wade, that this blog was inspired by ….

http://time.com/money/4561314/women-work-home-gender-gap/

My Passionflower In The Present Looks Back At The Cancerous Daffodil Of My Past

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Recently re-fitting out my first book, The Path To Cure, as a new audio book for a podcast was a ginormous 18 month long project. Jeff asked me to write a brand new intro to every chapter being revealed to a brand new audience weekly. As a result, I had to relive every one of my words written, wrought with so much pain and suffering from the past. For this month’s newsletter theme on Cancer, I chose to decorate the banner with the passion flower instead of the daffodil. Perhaps below, and in our blogs contained herein, you’ll understand the dynamic reason for this.

The truth is that what you’re destined to be is buried like a passionflower seed in your loins and to fully actuate your passion means first finding your individual seed, discerning what it means, and then providing the conditions ripe for it to grow. Think about what you’ve engaged with in life where you truly lose all track of time. If you still can’t figure it out, pick up Boni Lonsburry’s book, The Map to a Responsive Universe Where Dreams Really Do Come True.

Boni acknowledges that while not everyone knows what they want to be, she correctly cites that everyone knows how they want to feel. By holding the charge of feeling and tossing over board your beliefs that you’re value is not great enough to receive such abundance, you can create the circumstances ripe for what you feel ordained to be. Your passionflower will begin to self-actuate and seemingly random opportunities will start to crystallize.

Cancer grows in an environment devoid of heat (resonant sex), oxygen (principled recreation) and love (true desire function). The opposite is the recipe for a fully orgasmic life!

Sugar and chocolate are suppressive and a function of an oral block. She just can’t get the sweet passion out of life!  Eating sugar and chocolate is really a sad attempt to garner the sweetness from life externally instead of through primary drives internally. You’re not wholly expressing your feelings to yourself, or others in your life, or fully actualizing your love function (your passion) through to a full fruition (the fruit itself).  You have to have juicy sex with the whole of your world.

A primary drive as per full actualization is feeling so connected to your love function that you make no excuses to create what you love confidently and share it with the world unabashedly. This God-imbued talent or gift is hidden in your generative capacity and as you go through Heilkunst treatment, it will get harder and harder to suppress it.  Your passion flower can not be suppressed long-term without symptoms.

Don’t be surprised if you suddenly start doodling while on the phone, or magically waking up with whole poems written in your head, or feel driven to teach others how to ferment their own foods, sew baby’s clothing and sell them, coach a fellow mom at her birth, or suddenly pick up a musical instrument, dance, sing, teach, research or become an astronaut. These are just examples I’m thinking of from specific patients I’ve served.

Perhaps this year, you’re poised to find the man or woman of your dreams to have the kind of spiritual and romantic sex that you’ve always dreamed of. Don’t ever settle for anything less, as the Cancer state of mind will reduce your bar, sublimating your true desire function into watching television, eating non-resonant junk foods, doing things for family members to the exclusion of yourself more out of obligation than love or working that tortuous 9-5 desk job in that 10 x 12 cubicle with the daily 3 hour commute.

Cancer is a state of mind defined as the disease of resignation.  You’ll hear her say things like, “Well, if I don’t do it, no one else will. And certainly no one can do it as well as me.”  They’re exhausted, burnt out.  When you listen to them, your internal pathetic meter will be activated.  I know, as I used to provoke this response in others.  Due to my lack of inner guidance system, folks would happily step up to take over and tell me precisely their agenda and how I’d want to come along.

Cancer loves a false authority which is why I gravitated to false patriarchal constructs like Judaism and also worked for the Government. If someone asked me how I was, I put my child in front of me like a mascot for my un-lived life.  The truth was, I didn’t really know.  I was just that pathetic an I ended up with an inch and a half round tumour in my left breast as an emblem of how I was devoid of self-nurturing and a real sense of my self.

Let us know if you feel you’re suffering the same and we’ll provide you with the therapeutic keys to harness your own passion flower.  We all deserve to wholly self-actualize.  I should know … and, oh baby, I do.  It’s why I stepped up onto “The Path to Cure.”

Childhood, disrupted

An excellent article, published on Aeon on how childhood trauma manifests as physical disease later on:

Adversity in childhood can create long-lasting scars, damaging our cells and our DNA, and making us sick as adults

by Donna Jackson Nakazawa

 

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Photo by Charles Gullung/Gallery Stock

 

If you saw Laura walking down the New York City street where she lives today, you’d see a well-dressed 46-year-old woman with auburn hair and green eyes, who exudes a sense of ‘I matter here.’ She looks entirely in charge of her life, but behind Laura’s confident demeanour lies a history of trauma: a bipolar mother who vacillated between braiding her daughter’s hair and peppering her with insults, and a father who moved out-of-state with his wife-to-be when Laura was 15 years old.

She recalls a family trip to the Grand Canyon when she was 10. In a photo taken that day, Laura and her parents sit on a bench, sporting tourist whites. ‘Anyone looking at us would have assumed that we were a normal, loving family.’ But as they put on fake smiles for the camera, Laura’s mother suddenly pinched her daughter’s midriff and told her to stop ‘staring off into space’. A second pinch: ‘No wonder you’re turning into a butterball, you ate so much cheesecake last night you’re hanging over your shorts!’ If you look hard at Laura’s face in the photograph, you can see that she’s not squinting at the Arizona sun, but holding back tears.

After her father left the family, he sent cards and money, but called less and less. Meanwhile, her mother’s untreated bipolar disorder worsened. Sometimes, Laura says: ‘My mom would go on a vitriolic diatribe about my dad until spittle foamed on her chin. I’d stand there, trying not to hear her as she went on and on, my whole body shaking inside.’ Laura never invited friends over, for fear they’d find out her secret: her mom ‘wasn’t like other moms’.

Some 30 years later, Laura says: ‘In many ways, no matter where I go or what I do, I’m still in my mother’s house.’ Today, ‘If a car swerves into my lane, a grocery store clerk is rude, my husband and I argue, or my boss calls me in to talk over a problem, I feel something flip over inside. It’s like there’s a match standing inside too near a flame, and with the smallest breeze, it ignites.’

To see Laura, you’d never know that she is ‘always shaking a little, only invisibly, deep down in my cells’.

Her sense that something is wrong inside is mirrored by her physical health. During a routine exam, Laura’s doctor discovered that Laura was suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy and would require a cardioverter defibrillator to keep her heart pumping. The two-inch scar from her surgery only hints at the more severe scars she hides from her childhood.

For as long as John can remember, he says, his parents’ marriage was deeply troubled, as was his relationship with his father. ‘I consider myself to have been raised by my mom and her mom. I longed to feel a deeper connection with my dad, but it just wasn’t there. He couldn’t extend himself in that way.’ John’s poor relationship with his father was due, in large part, to his father’s reactivity and need for control. For instance, if John’s father said that the capital of New York was New York City, there was just no use telling him that it was Albany.

As John got older, it seemed wrong to him that his father ‘was constantly pointing out all the mistakes that my brother and I made, without acknowledging any of his own’. His father relentlessly criticised his mother, who was ‘kinder and more confident’. Aged 12, John began to interject himself into the fights between his parents. He remembers one Christmas Eve, when he found his father with his hands around his mother’s neck and had to separate them. ‘I was always trying to be the adult between them,’ John says.

John is now a boyish 40, with warm hazel eyes and a wide, affable grin. But beneath his easy, open demeanour, he struggles with an array of chronic illnesses. By the time he was 33, his blood pressure was shockingly high; he began to experience bouts of stabbing stomach pain and diarrhoea and often had blood in his stool; he struggled from headaches almost daily. By 34, he’d developed chronic fatigue, and was so wiped out that he sometimes struggled to make it through an entire workday.

John’s relationships, like his body, were never completely healthy. He ended a year?long romance with a woman he deeply loved because he felt riddled with anxiety around her normal, ‘happy family’. He just didn’t know how to fit in. ‘She wanted to help,’ he says, ‘but instead of telling her how insecure I was around her, I told her I wasn’t in love with her.’ Bleeding from his inflamed intestines, exhausted by chronic fatigue, debilitated and distracted by pounding headaches, often struggling with work, and unable to feel comfortable in a relationship, John was stuck in a universe of pain and solitude, and he couldn’t get out.

Laura’s and John’s life stories illustrate the physical price we can pay, as adults, for trauma that took place 10, 20, even 30 years ago. New findings in neuroscience, psychology and immunology tell us that the adversity we face during childhood has farther-reaching consequences than we might ever have imagined. Today, in labs across the country, neuroscientists are peering into the once-inscrutable brain-body connection, and breaking down, on a biochemical level, exactly how the stress we experience during childhood and adolescence catches up with us when we are adults, altering our bodies, our cells, and even our DNA.

Emotional stress in adult life affects us on a physical level in quantifiable, life-altering ways. We all know that when we are stressed, chemicals and hormones can flush our body and increase levels of inflammation. That’s why stressful events in adult life are correlated with the likelihood of getting a cold or having a heart attack.

But when children or teens face adversity and especially unpredictable stressors, they are left with deeper, longer?lasting scars. When the young brain is thrust into stressful situations over and over again without warning, and stress hormones are repeatedly ramped up, small chemical markers, known as methyl groups, adhere to specific genes that regulate the activity of stress?hormone receptors in the brain. These epigenetic changes hamper the body’s ability to turn off the stress response. In ideal circumstances, a child learns to respond to stress, and recover from it, learning resilience. But kids who’ve faced chronic, unpredictable stress undergo biological changes that cause their inflammatory stress response to stay activated.

Joan Kaufman, director of the Child and Adolescent Research and Education (CARE) programme at the Yale School of Medicine, recently analysed DNA in the saliva of happy, healthy children, and of children who had been taken from abusive or neglectful parents. The children who’d experienced chronic childhood stress showed epigenetic changes in almost 3,000 sites on their DNA, and on all 23 chromosomes – altering how appropriately they would be able to respond to and rebound from future stressors.

Kids who’ve had early adversity have a drip of fight-or-flight hormones turned on every day – it’s as if there is no off switch

Likewise, Seth Pollak, professor of psychology and director of the Child Emotion Research Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin at Madison, uncovered startling genetic changes in children with a history of adversity and trauma. Pollak identified damage to a gene responsible for calming the stress response. This particular gene wasn’t working properly; the kids’ bodies weren’t able to reign in their heightened stress response. ‘A crucial set of brakes are off,’ says Pollak.

Imagine for a moment that your body receives its stress hormones and chemicals through an IV drip that’s turned on high when needed and, when the crisis passes, it’s switched off again. You might think of kids whose brains have undergone epigenetic changes because of early adversity as having an inflammation-promoting drip of fight-or-flight hormones turned on every day – it’s as if there is no off switch.

Experiencing stress in childhood changes your set point of wellbeing for decades to come. In people such as Laura and John, the endocrine and immune systems are churning out a damaging and inflammatory cocktail of stress neurochemicals in response to even small stressors – an unexpected bill, a disagreement with their spouse, a car that swerves in front of them on the highway, a creak on the staircase – for the rest of their lives. They might find themselves overreacting to, and less able to recover from, the inevitable stressors of life. They’re always responding. And all the while, they’re unwittingly marinating in inflammatory chemicals, which sets the stage for full-throttle disease down the road, in the form of autoimmune disease, heart disease, cancer, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue, fibroid tumours, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcers, migraines and asthma.

Scientists first came to understand the relationship between early chronic stress and later adult disease through the work of a dedicated physician in San Diego and a determined epidemiologist from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta. Together, during the 1980s and ’90s – the years when Laura and John were growing up – these two researchers began a paradigm-shifting public-health investigation known as the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study.

In 1985, Vincent J Felitti, chief of a revolutionary preventive care initiative at the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care programme in San Diego, noticed a startling pattern in adult patients at an obesity clinic. A significant number were, with the support of Felitti and his nurses, successfully losing hundreds of pounds a year, a remarkable feat, only to withdraw from the programme despite weight-loss success. Felitti, determined to get to the bottom of the attrition rate, conducted face-to-face interviews with 286 patients. It turned out there was a common denominator. Many confided that they had suffered some sort of trauma, often sexual abuse, in their childhoods. To these patients, eating was a solution, not a problem: it soothed the anxiety and depression they had harboured for decades; their weight served as a shield against undesired attention, and they didn’t want to let it go.

Felitti’s interviews gave him a new way of looking at human health and wellbeing that other physicians just weren’t seeing. He presented his findings at a national obesity conference, arguing that ‘our intractable public health problems’ had root causes hidden ‘by shame, by secrecy, and by social taboos against exploring certain areas of life experience’. Felitti’s peers were quick to blast him. One even stood up in the audience and accused Felitti of offering ‘excuses’ for patients’ ‘failed lives’. Felitti, however, remained unfazed; he felt sure that he had stumbled upon a piece of information that would hold enormous import for the field of medicine.

After a colleague who attended that same conference suggested that he design a study with thousands of patients who suffered from a wide variety of diseases, not just obesity, Felitti joined forces with Robert Anda, a medical epidemiologist at the CDC who had, at the time, been researching the relationship between coronary heart disease and depression. Felitti and Anda took advantage of Kaiser Permanente’s vast patient cohort to set up a national epidemiology laboratory. Of the 26,000 patients they invited to take part in their study, more than 17,000 agreed.

Anda and Felitti surveyed these 17,000 individuals on about 10 types of adversity, or adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), probing into patients’ childhood and adolescent histories. Questions included: ‘Was a biological parent ever lost to you through divorce, abandonment or other reason?’; ‘Did a parent or other adult in the household often swear at you, insult you, put you down or humiliate you?’; and ‘Was a household member depressed or mentally ill?’ Other questions looked at types of family dysfunction that included growing up with a parent who was an alcoholic or addicted to other substances; being physically or emotionally neglected; being sexually or physically abused; witnessing domestic violence; having a family member who was sent to prison; feeling that there was no one to provide protection; and feeling that one’s family didn’t look out for each other. For each category to which a patient responded ‘yes’, one point would be added to her ACE score, so an ACE score of 2 would indicate that she had suffered two adverse childhood experiences.

To be clear, the patients Felitti and Anda surveyed were not troubled or disadvantaged; the average patient was 57, and three-quarters had attended college. These were ‘successful’ men and women, mostly white, middle-class, with stable jobs and health benefits. Felitti and Anda expected their number of ‘yes’ answers to be fairly low.

The correlation between having a difficult childhood and facing illness as an adult offered a whole new lens through which we could view human health and disease

When the results came in, Felitti and Anda were shocked: 64 per cent of participants answered ‘yes’ to having encountered at least one category of early adversity, and 87 per cent of those patients also had additional adverse childhood experiences; 40 per cent had suffered two or more ACEs; 12.5 per cent had an ACE score greater than or equal to 4.

Felitti and Anda wanted to find out whether there was a correlation between the number of adverse childhood experiences an individual had faced, and the number and severity of illnesses and disorders she developed as an adult. The correlation proved so powerful that Anda was not only ‘stunned’, but deeply moved.

‘I wept,’ he says. ‘I saw how much people had suffered, and I wept.’

Felitti, too, was deeply affected. ‘Our findings exceeded anything we had conceived. The correlation between having a difficult childhood and facing illness as an adult offered a whole new lens through which we could view human health and disease.’

Here, says Felitti, ‘was the missing piece as to what was causing so much of our unspoken suffering as human beings’.

The number of adverse childhood experiences a patient had suffered could by and large predict the amount of medical care she would require in adulthood: the higher the ACE score, the higher the number of doctor’s appointments she’d had in the past year, and the more unexplained physical symptoms she’d reported.

People with an ACE score of 4 were twice as likely to be diagnosed with cancer than people who hadn’t faced any form of childhood adversity. For each point an individual had, her chance of being hospitalised with an autoimmune disease in adulthood rose 20 per cent. Someone with an ACE score of 4 was 460 per cent more likely to face depression than someone with a score of 0.

An ACE score of 6 or higher shortened an individual’s lifespan by almost 20 years.

Researchers wondered if those who encountered childhood adversity were also more likely to smoke, drink and overeat as a sort of coping strategy, and while that was sometimes the case, unhealthy habits didn’t wholly account for the correlation Felitti and Anda saw between adverse childhood experiences and later illness. For instance, those with ACE scores greater than or equal to 7 who didn’t drink or smoke, weren’t overweight or diabetic, and didn’t have high cholesterol stillhad a 360 per cent higher risk of heart disease than those with ACE scores of 0.

‘Time,’ says Felitti, ‘does not heal all wounds. One does not “just get over” something – not even 50 years later.’ Instead, he says: ‘Time conceals. And human beings convert traumatic emotional experiences in childhood into organic disease later in life.’

Often, these illnesses can be chronic and lifelong. Autoimmune disease. Heart disease. Chronic bowel disorders. Migraines. Persistent depression. Even today, doctors puzzle over these very conditions: why are they so prevalent; why are some patients more prone to them than others; and why are they so difficult to treat?

The more research that’s done, the more granular details emerge about the profound link between adverse experiences and adult disease. Scientists at Duke University in North Carolina, the University of California, San Francisco, and Brown University in Rhode Island have shown that childhood adversity damages us on a cellular level in ways that prematurely age our cells and affect our longevity. Adults who faced early life stress show greater erosion in what are known as telomeres – protective caps that sit on the ends of DNA strands to keep the DNA healthy and intact. As telomeres erode, we’re more likely to develop disease, and we age faster; as our telomeres age and expire, our cells expire and so, eventually, do we.

Researchers have also seen a correlation between specific types of adverse childhood experiences and a range of diseases. For instance, children whose parents die, or who face emotional or physical abuse, or experience childhood neglect, or witness marital discord between their parents are more likely to develop cardiovascular disease, lung disease, diabetes, headaches, multiple sclerosis and lupus as adults. Facing difficult circumstances in childhood increases six-fold your chances of having myalgic encephalomyelitis (chronic fatigue syndrome) as an adult. Kids who lose a parent have triple the risk of depression in their lifetimes. Children whose parents divorce are twice as likely to suffer a stroke later down the line.

Laura and John’s stories illustrate that the past can tick away inside us for decades like a silent time bomb, until it sets off a cellular message that lets us know the body does not forget its history.

Something that happened to you when you were five or 15 can land you in the hospital 30 years later

John’s ACE score would be a 3: a parent often put him down; he witnessed his mother being harmed; and, clearly, his father suffered from an undiagnosed behaviour health disorder, perhaps narcissism or depression, or both.

Laura had an ACE score of 4.

Laura and John are hardly alone. Two-thirds of American adults are carrying wounds from childhood quietly into adulthood, with little or no idea of the extent to which these wounds affect their daily health and wellbeing. Something that happened to you when you were five or 15 can land you in the hospital 30 years later, whether that something was headline news, or happened quietly, without anyone else knowing it, in the living room of your childhood home.

The adversity a child faces doesn’t have to be severe abuse in order to create deep biophysical changes that can lead to chronic health conditions in adulthood.

‘Our findings showed that the 10 different types of adversity we examined were almost equal in their damage,’ says Felitti. He and Anda found that no single ACE significantly trumped another. This was true even though some types, such as being sexually abused, are far worse in that society regards them as particularly shameful, and others, such as physical abuse, are more overt in their violence.

This makes sense if you think about how the stress response functions on an optimal level. You meet a bear in the woods, and your body floods with adrenaline and cortisol so that you can quickly decide whether to run in the opposite direction or stay and try to frighten the bear. After you deal with the crisis, you recover, your stress hormones abate, and you go home with a great story. For Laura and John, though, that feeling that the bear is still out there, somewhere, circling in the woods, stalking, and might strike again any day, anytime – that feeling never disappears.

There are a lot of bears out there. Chronic parental discord; enduring low-dose humiliation or blame and shame; chronic teasing; the quiet divorce between two secretly seething parents; a parent’s premature exit from a child’s life; the emotional scars of growing up with a hypercritical, unsteady, narcissistic, bipolar, alcoholic, addicted or depressed parent; physical or emotional abuse or neglect: these happen in all too many families. Although the details of individual adverse experiences differ from one home to another and from one neighbourhood to another, they are all precursors to the same organic chemical changes deep in the gray matter of the developing brain.

Every few decades, a groundbreaking psychosocial ‘theory of everything’ helps us to develop a new understanding of why we are the way we are – and how we got that way. In the early 20th century, the psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud transformed the landscape of psychology when he argued that the unconscious rules much of our waking life and dreams. Jungian theory taught, among other ideas, that we tend toward introversion or extroversion, which led the American educationalist Katharine Cook Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers to develop a personality indicator. More recently, neuroscientists discovered that age ‘zero to three’ was a critical synaptic window for brain development, giving birth to Head Start and other preschool programmes. The correlation between childhood trauma, brain architecture and adult wellbeing is the newest, and perhaps our most important, psychobiological theory of everything.

Today’s research on adverse childhood experiences revolutionises how we see ourselves, our understanding of how we came to be the way we are, why we love the way we do, how we can better nurture our children, and how we can work to realise our potential.

To date, more than 1,500 studies founded on Felitti and Anda’s hallmark ACE research show that both physical and emotional suffering are rooted in the complex workings of the immune system, the body’s master operating control centre – and what happens to the brain during childhood sets the programming for how our immune systems will respond for the rest of our lives.

The unifying principle of this new theory of everything is this: your emotional biography becomes your physical biology, and together, they write much of the script for how you will live your life. Put another way: your early stories script your biology and your biology scripts the way your life will play out.

Unlike previous theories of everything, though, this one has been mind-bogglingly slow to change how we do medicine, according to Felitti. ‘Very few internists or medical schools are interested in embracing the added responsibility that this understanding imposes on them.’

With the ACE research now available, we might hope that physicians will begin to see patients as a holistic sum of their experiences and embrace the understanding that a stressor from long ago can be a health-risk time bomb that has exploded. Such a medical paradigm, which sees adverse childhood experiences as one of many key factors that can play a role in disease, could save many patients years in the healing process.

But seeing that connection takes a little time. It means asking patients to fill out the ACE questionnaire and delving into that patient’s history for insight into sources of both physical and emotional pain. As health-care budgets have become stretched, physicians spend less time interacting one-on-one with patients in their exam rooms; the average physician schedules patients back-to-back at 15-minute intervals.

Still, the cost of not intervening is far greater – not only in the loss of human health and wellbeing, but also in additional healthcare. According to the CDC, the total lifetime cost of child maltreatment in the US is $124 billion each year. The lifetime healthcare cost for each individual who experiences childhood maltreatment is estimated at $210,012 – comparable to other costly health conditions, such as having a stroke, which has a lifetime estimated cost of $159,846 per person, or type-2 diabetes, which is estimated to cost between $181,000 and $253,000.

Further hindering change is the fact that adult physical medicine and psychological medicine remain in separate silos. Utilising ACE research requires breaking down these long-standing divisions in healthcare between what is ‘physical’ and what is ‘mental’ or ‘emotional,’ and that’s hard to achieve. Physicians have been well-trained to deal only with what they can touch with their hands, see with their eyes, or view with microscopes or scans.

Just as physical wounds and bruises heal, just as we can regain our muscle tone, we can recover function in underconnected areas of the brain

However, now that we have scientific evidence that the brain is genetically modified by childhood experience, we can no longer draw that line in the sand. With hundreds of studies showing that childhood adversity hurts our mental and physical health, putting us at greater risk for learning disorders, cardiovascular disease, autoimmune disease, depression, obesity, suicide, substance abuse, failed relationships, violence, poor parenting and early death, we just can’t afford to make such distinctions.

Science tells us that biology does not have to be destiny. ACEs can last a lifetime, but they don’t have to. Just as physical wounds and bruises heal, just as we can regain our muscle tone, we can recover function in underconnected areas of the brain. If anything, that’s the most important take-away from ACE research: the brain and body are never static; they are always in the process of becoming and changing.

Even if we have been set on high-reactive mode for decades or a lifetime, we can still dial it down. We can respond to life’s inevitable stressors more appropriately and shift away from an overactive inflammatory response. We can become neurobiologically resilient. We can turn bad epigenetics into good epigenetics and rescue ourselves. We have the capacity, within ourselves, to create better health. We might call this brave undertaking ‘the neurobiology of awakening’.

Today, scientists recognise a range of promising approaches to help create new neurons (known as neurogenesis), make new synaptic connections between those neurons (known as synaptogenesis), promote new patterns of thoughts and reactions, bring underconnected areas of the brain back online – and reset our stress response so that we decrease the inflammation that makes us ill.

You can find ways to start right where you are, no matter how deep your scars or how long ago they occurred. Many mind-body therapies not only help you to calm your thoughts and increase your emotional and physical wellbeing, but research suggests that they have the potential to reverse, on a biological level, the harmful impact of childhood adversity.

Recent studies indicate that individuals who practice mindfulness meditation and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) show an increase in gray matter in parts of the brain associated with managing stress, and experience shifts in genes that regulate their stress response and their levels of inflammatory hormones. Other research suggests that a process known as neurofeedback can help to regrow connections in the brain that were lost to adverse childhood experiences.

Meditation, mindfulness, neurofeedback, cognitive therapy, EMDR (eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing) therapy: these promising new avenues to healing can be part of any patient’s recovery plan, if only healthcare practitioners would begin to treat the whole patient – past, present and future, without making distinctions between physical and mental health – and encourage patients to explore all the treatment options available to them. The more we learn about the toxic impact of early stress, the better equipped we are to counter its effects, and help to uncover new strategies and modalities to come back to who it is we really are, and who it was we might have been had we not encountered childhood adversity in the first place.

This is an adapted and reprinted extract from ‘Childhood Disrupted: How Your Biography Becomes Your Biology, and How You Can Heal’ (Atria), by Donna Jackson Nakazawa. Copyright © Donna Jackson Nakazawa, 2015.

The Anatomy of Stress … How We Use All 3 Jurisdictions of Heilkunst Medicine to Solve It

Stress is feeling impotent to execute a plan or desire.  It is the ultimate in feeling thwarted against the capacity to discharge an expectation into a state of realization.  In health, it feels like, “Ah, I did it!  I put the effort in and there it is, a big beautiful bouncing baby project, isn’t she lovely?!  I’m so proud!  Now I can finally bask in the glory of utter fulfillment!”  As a healthy person, I will have perfect trust and faith that my effort will ultimately lead to fulfillment of a desire; it is just a matter of time and it will.  I can trust in my healthy will and wisdom to get me to this state of full actualization.  Right?!

However, if your history with stress indicates that the arrival point never seems to come to fruition, it’s outside your reach, some insidious force seems to pervade that sabotages the whole damn thing, leaving you feeling like a bloody failure.  This cyclical pattern is just playing itself out yet AGAIN!!  Guilt, victimization, and self-hatred mounts and you do your very best not to take it out on those you love.  It is so hard, though, as the frustration seems to leak from your nostrils and ears.  You feel yourself seething with it below decks.

 

Also, you notice that weird things are starting to occur in your body; you haven’t slept through the night in months, your hair may be falling out in the shower, you’ve been having mild gallbladder attacks or kidney stones , your sex drive is dried up and mostly gone, you’re suffering heartburn, and your craving for sweets is off the charts, you’re peeing like a racehorse way too frequently. What the heck is going on?

 

You feel the anger and frustration mounting.  Perhaps it is a pattern around finances, the full realization of one’s inner value in the external ambient.  Perhaps your inner milieu wants that juicy job sailing tourists around the world, but for now you’re stuck as a palliative care nurse (true story, btw).  The prevailing feeling being that you trained for that job and you’re resigned to remaining at it until you can magically conjure the readies to make the transition. Perhaps you’re still living out of your parents’ expectations.  On paper, though, it feels like you may never garner the gumption or resources to make the leap.  For now, your feet are stuck in cement.  Argghhhhhh!

Although you have the pictures of sailboats plastered to your walls at home, it still feels like a far-off pipe dream.  What about all those affirmations, “I am sailing the world, I feel the ocean breeze on my face, I am cutting the jib!”  And then, the reality of waking at winter’s dawn to catch the bus in the dark and cold invades your spirit with the most brutal of realities.  You feel raw, sore, and jagged inside.  What happened to that wee kid in you that used to race with the wind on your bike, build forts, and dream about becoming a rock star?!

You ask yourself, over and over again, what am I missing?  How come everyone else seems to be realizing their dreams, but I can’t seem to get past token actions of having bought the organic sunscreen?  Am I not deserving enough?  Haven’t I done my time?  When is it my turn to fully actualize my essential self and my dreams?  Does this sound familiar to you?  Are you tired of hearing the tirades of angst in your head?

We’ve got you!  We lived this matrix prior as well.  We know that stress is the #2 killer (just after allopathic drugs) in North America.  We’re going to help you get out of the pain and suffering that has you secretly rocking back and forth, sucking on your thumb in that broom closet or bathroom stall when you think no one’s looking.  We see you and we also have the tools to help.

 

There are 3 jurisdictions of Heilkunst Medicine.  The first is Regimen (nutrition, hydration, dormition, recreation, coition).  Basically, you must stop messing around!  Cut out the refined sugars and carbs, and eat more for your blood type.  This is really critical.  We have other blogs (3 Streams in Heilkunst) on why this is, so go read those if you need further justification.  Start drinking 2.5 – 3 litres of pure spring water per day (ABC’s of Healthy Regimen).  

 

Start exercising for your blood type (Exercise for my Blood Type) and playing at a sport you love.  I’m a “B” blood type and I love weekly hikes up into the hills where I live, yoga several times per week, and my meditation practice. Also, start winding down earlier in the evening, reading that self-help book or perhaps a novel about 45-50 minutes before bedtime and lights out.  It is really important that you kill the lights and computer stimulation so that your autonomic nervous system can depart gracefully into sleep.

Sex is brilliant!  If you’re not thusly conjoint with a resonant beloved partner, sex on your own is pretty delicious too.  Love on yourself in the same way, using the same gestures that you would have your supreme lover engage with you.  The idea being that you can’t wholly plumb love in your ambient until you’ve nailed down those delicious romantic gestures from inside.  Love and romance is fostered from the inside out.

 

Also, the crazy thing is that while fever invokes a healthy immune function in a child, sex actually is the healthy expression of rage, anger, and stress in an adult.  The more you teach your body, through pleasure, how to feel tension, charge, discharge, and then relaxation in its cells and the autonomic nervous system, the more it will recall this same gesture in everyday life.  If you’re having trouble, though, executing through intimacy we can help with character analysis and resonant remediation.

The second jurisdiction of Heilkunst Medicine, is medicine proper.  It’s peeling back the timeline onion of your stress-riddled adulthood, which no doubt stemmed from how you were raised as a child (Sigmunda would agree).  In many cases, it is also anchored in your childhood, the genetic miasms, chthonic fears and ideogenic beliefs.  It can take a bit of time, in conjunction with pathic remedies like lycopodium (key rx for impotence), aurum metallicum (working with little reward), sepia (‘if someone asks me for one more thing …’), staphysagria (repeated patterns of victimization), lachesis (guilt, resentment, shame) and ignatia (long term grief and disappointment).  

We also employ brilliant flower essences like cherry plum (where your back is seemingly against the proverbial wall), white chestnut (for you cycling through the same old patterns over and over again), larch (for a lack of confidence), etc.

 

The third jurisdiction is therapeutic education, or Anthroposophical (study of man) Orgonomy (addressing armour/beliefs).  This is the area where we help you to stop reinfecting yourself with the old states of mind that no longer serve you.  This occurs more in tandem, or after, the diseases are mostly cured and your timeline resolved. Going after your character structure for why you felt you needed to live feeling thwarted and impotent in the first place is part of an illusion of belief.  Poverty consciousness (not just about money) is, after all just a state of mind, albeit a powerful one.  It can be cured just like the others.

Start, perhaps, by taking a look, at the following resources and see how they impact on you:

Florence Scovel Shinn – http://bit.ly/Flossy

Emilie Cady – http://bit.ly/HEmilie

Neville Goddard – http://bit.ly/TheLawandPromise

 

Conscious creation plays a very big part in replacing the subconscious program of feeling victimized by stress-filled circumstances.  You are ordained with the capacity to self-rescue yourself from the habitual armouring, perpetuating chronic beliefs that you’re not enough.  It is not about more doing or effort!  It IS about having the health to identify where you’re wrong thinking patterns exist and having a deep desire to change them.

 

The final frontier of Heilkunst Medicine (or Romantic Science), the complete medical system, is the realm of using your very own God-imbued wisdom to excavate you from your mired beliefs.  This is not the illusory or superficial “law of attraction,” although the gesture came from same roots, with medicine and regimen, you can more permanently exact the life that you’ve always wanted for yourself by “BEING” the answer you want to “BE” in the world starting now, right this minute, impressing this new data onto your subconscious and employing it as the change agent on your behalf.  Your ambient will buck up to this new expectation, it is the LAW of RESONANCE.  The thing is, do you have to strengthen your muscles of FAITH to hold the charge?  Are you ready?

Here’s a testimonial from a  patient who was suffering with chronic stress and anxiety.  Here’s one who suffered from performance anxiety.

My new book, soon to be released on Amazon, speaks more liberally to this process:

 

Book Review; The Art Of Falling Apart

The Art Of Falling Apart
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Allyson,
 
Thank-you for sharing your book with me! 
 
This is your most intimate, and illuminating, piece of work so far- it was a baptism by fire for sure!
 
You drew me into your inner world- taking me through the dark recesses of our primal fears, self-doubt, and the dying away of the false ego, to emerge, renewed and more wholly in relationship, with your Self and your life. It’s heartfelt, terrifying, beautiful, and inspiring. 
 
Often practitioners are placed on a pedestal (or we falsely place ourselves on one). Because our work is to guide others towards ousting the false ego, resolving trauma and aiding in their trajectory towards claiming the essential self- we must, to a degree, be able to do this ourselves. Therefore, it is humbling when find that we still have a lot of personal work to do, and I think sometimes, we feel shame when we falter. We need to confront that fear of revealing, that we too, are still in a process of becoming. It is a vulnerable position, and yet, it is the very thing that is necessary.
 
With this book you have illustrated the darkest part of our unfoldment, where we enter into the recesses of our fears and assume, with full consciousness, who we are meant to be. Many of us turn away at this point, because it requires that we acknowledge, and act, on our truth. This is not easy, requiring that we stay with the chaos, and have faith, surrendering, and allowing, the facade to burn away. It can be wholly life-altering if we have built our relationships, and our lives, on who we thought we were (or felt we needed to be).  It’s seemingly easier to suppress symptoms and dis-ease, disassociate from our truth, and stay in our delusions, that is, until we are faced with our ultimatum. You have illustrated this so beautifully. I felt your fear, your brokenness, your self-doubt, your bravery.
 
Then you take us into the warm embrace of self-care, and the traversing of this passage, with tenderness and self-love. This is one of the toughest things for most of us to do. “What? Am I actually going to ask for, and do, what I need to get well? What about XYZ? I can’t.” Your false ego was flat-lined, and you did. I felt like I was there with you, building up your relationship with your self, acknowledging and acting on your desires. It was tender at first, and then I could feel your energy build. I felt the enthusiasm as your love function became activated, and celebrated, when you found yourself with your kin, wholly in love. 
 
Your book felt like an intimate, resonant conversation; these are the conversations that I crave. It could only have been achieved if you allowed yourself to truly be seen, and to speak, from your heart, and from your truth. It is a remedy, truly, for those that are still pursuing this passage. With the sharing of your story, you become a maverick, and give others a hope, and faith in their capacity, to become who they are meant to be.
 
Thank-you Ally.
xo
 
Let me know if you need anything else.
Love,
S
  
 
 
 

“My Partner Just Doesn’t Get Me!”

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Click on the image to view the article “The Love You Deserve” by The Good Men Project

 

I had a woman express openly at the recent Womyn’s Summit I attended that her partner, “just doesn’t get her; that he’s just so opposite.”

Our chosen lovers can feel like dissonant others over time if we don’t develop a deep, loving and abiding relationship with our own nether being. Our gut will haunt us openly with our own harboured fears of abandonment if we’re in fact abandoning ourselves.

We will think that it is the fault of the other, however, he’s only operating out of resonance. Most folks don’t know that their outer ambient is a direct reflection of their inner milieux.

If we’re broadcasting a radio station of personal disregard, the only individuals that can pick that up and tune into us in that way are those with the same radio frequency on their dial.

To resolve the underlying cause means taking responsibility ourselves for what is being mirrored back to us. Once that schism is addressed then we can actually change our relationship with ourselves to a deep inner regard, then based on the laws of resonance we will see that behaviour mirrored directly back to us.

This is not a superficial changing of one’s mind, though, a bunch of affirmations on our bedroom mirror or some intellectual gymnastics. This is the deep work of those facing beliefs coming from timeline traumas, Miasmic (inherited diseases), Chthonic (fear and ignorance) and Ideogenic (Spiritual beliefs) sources.

Out the other side, though, you will own the pure grace you seek. After that work is done, you’ll feel such fulfilment, you’ll barely noticed what others are up to, except that they keep bestowing gifts of love and regard on you!  I know as I was once living the belief that “he just doesn’t get me.”

It was a cop out, an excuse, for not facing what I knew was mine.  Now, I have the love I deserve mirrored back to me and I’m able to wholly receive it and mirror it back to my beloved.  All the dissonance simply melted away with the utter reverence I’m now able to hold for my self.

Multiple Sclerosis; Stored Up Rage And Resentment From Childhood and Even Past Lives

 

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Do you know someone with MS? Did you know that they’re harbouring every childhood slight, resentment and undischarged bit of hatred and rage in their body?  They’re not properly threaded in the capacity to discharge their feelings.  Their literally a “nervous” wreck creating an abnormal hardening of the body tissue in an effort to “hang on” due to an excessive resistance to change.

Their issues are deep and karmic. The spasms and chronic inflammation are an indication of their armour‘s inability to let go. In technical terms, they’re ‘sympathetic storming’ and through Heilkunst treatment, we work to help them to let go of their stored up content and respect the parasympathetic state of wisdom and relaxation.  It isn’t easy as they’ve been postured in this gesture typically a long time.  Some have even been born in this contractive feedback loop.

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Subconsciously, the MS patient has chosen to store up all that content and turn it in on themselves in a defiant act of self-martyrdom. The roots lie mostly in the Genetic Miasms Cancer, Syphilis and Lyme.  They will say things like, “I’m completely useless and worthless” for which the remedies Aurum and Lachesis will help to start lapping away at their deeper pathology.

Here’s Narayan Singh’s (aka Michael J. Lincoln) “Messages From The Body” on MS:

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS (Loss of nerve endings, resulting in weakness and incoordination)
‘Wardening of the attitudes.” They are being forced to look at things they’ve never looked at

before, including past life stuff. They are having to live life for the moment, and to be crystal clear about

what they can have and what they can’t have. They have typically been highly oppressive and coercively

demanding in their pattern in past lives. They have a will of iron, and they are intensely inflexible, all of

which arises out of a generalized dread. They have taken on their situation with self-willed determination,

in a “true grit” response to the situation, leading to a “pit bull” stubbornness and to a “going down

fighting” approach. They have taken on a real mental hard-nosed and hard-headed approach. It is the

resultant of growing up in a rigidly patriarchal household.

……………………………….

“Exploitation-rage.” They feel like they have been forced to undertake hard physical work or

its equivalent in energy output against their will. They feel there is no support or assistance, and that they

have to sustain everyone all by themselves. They hate it, and they desperately want help and support.

They feel that they have exhausted themselves, and they really resent it. They feel alone and alienated,

and they are full of despair. They are in effect wreaking revenge upon those who never loved them.

Their family were exploitive and demanding, with little or no concern for their needs or welfare.

……………………………….

“Gotta take care of it myself!” They are into severe martyr-tripping, guilt-inducing and massive

control-tripping. They have a real “thing” about reforming and reforming things. They are very rigid

and moralistic, with a steel-reinforced value system and a fixed way of looking at the world and of doing

things. They are fearful that if they don’t take a personal hand in things, it will all go to hell in a bread

basket. They have a great deal of bottom line despair in response to their original severely dysfunctional

and judgmental family, in which they played the “hero(ine)-rescuer.” They were the “family hoist”,

and inflexibly disaster-deflection became their specialty.

……………………………….

“Self-straight-jacketing.” They are fearful of being free, and they are terrified of their true feelings. They are repressing their emotions, and they are therefore trapping themselves into immobilization and muscular atrophy. They are as a result unable to cope or to flow with change or to work in a co-creative and cooperative relationship with the world. They have then subsequently “selective electromagnetically” attracted and been attracted to overwhelming situations and relationships just like the original family’s scene. They therefore have a strong codependent “rescue trip” pattern which is now leading to a final denouement with regard to learning the lessons involved.

 

As mentioned in another blog, a person only has three possible outcomes when addressing a disease matrix : cure, suppression or palliation.  The bottom line is that you can work to cure it with Heilkunst Medicine or try to suppress it with drugs that cost about $15,000 – $20,000 per year.  It depends entirely on what your personal goals are as sussing out the root cause and coming to terms with the emotional and karmic aetiology is never easy, either.

How Heilkunst Can Solve IBS, Colitis and Crohn’s

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If you’re reading this, you have our upmost sympathy.  I know from treating folks with IBS, Crohn’s, and Colitis over the last 12 years that when you first come to us that you may be deeply despairing and given up much hope.  Yes, we know about the drugs and the limited prognosis on the allopathic side of the fence.  We also knot the limitations of most alternative therapies too.  Believe me, we’ve lived this too with our own issues. We get it.

Now, I know you want to know what we’re going to do about it.  Well, the answer is multiple and dynamic.  The first thing that we want to know is what is your timeline peppered with in the way of events?  What are the nature of your physical and emotional traumas?  Also, what is your present state of mind?

Did you know that fear of losing control can be a big emotional aspect of this disease matrix?  Of course you do.  Did you know that unexpressed rage, frustration and anger is also a very large component too?  Yes, you secretly have known that too.  Now, you want to know what we’re going to help you do about it, don’t you?  Give me a second, we’re getting there.

Ok, now that we’ve got some of the “state of mind” sussed out, we’re going to recommend basic things like slowly integrating high doses of a broad spectrum probiotics and fermented foods to replenish your microbiome as well as EFA’s (Essential Fatty Acids) to help restore the gut and start working on assimilation. Lots of folks with Crohn’s have missed a gut full of healthy bacteria even since birth when they should have grabbed a big gulp of probiotics from their Mom when passing down through the birth canal.  This deficit is a big part of the Crohn’s symptoms picture.  The other aspects is to ensure that you’re getting enough pure spring water, sleep and pristine nutrition, based on your blood type typology, will also be key.

 

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Then, we’re going to provide you a dynamic set of homeopathic remedies specifically for emotional support and drainage and organ support.  One of the key rx, Arsenicum, for IBS, Crohn’s and Colitis will have a description like this excerpt from Dr. Henry Clarke’s Materia Medica.  These are some of the symptoms that we will apply the law of cure for:

 

12. Abdomen.?Compression in the region of the liver.?Swelling of the spleen.?Excessive pains in the abdomen, principally on the left side, and often with great anguish in the abdomen.?Inflation of the abdomen.?Ascites.?Swelling of the abdomen as in ascites.?Hard bloated abdomen.?Violent cutting pains, cramp-like pains, digging, pulling, tearing, and gnawing in the abdomen.?Attacks of colic occur chiefly after having drunk or eaten, or in the night, and are often accompanied by vomiting or diarrhœa, with cold, internal heat, or cold sweat.?Burning pains with anguish.?Sensation of cold, or insupportable burning in the abdomen.?Pain, as from a wound in the abdomen, chiefly on coughing and laughing.?Swelling and induration of the mesenteric glands.?Much flatulency, with rumbling in the abdomen.?Flatulency of a putrid smell.?Painful swelling of the inguinal glands.?Ulcer above the navel.

13. Stool and Anus.?Tenesmus, with burning in the anus.?Involuntary and unperceived evacuations.?Violent diarrhœa, with frequent evacuations, nausea, vomiting, thirst, great weakness, colic, and tenesmus.?Nocturnal diarrhœa, and renewal of the diarrhœa, after having drunk or eaten.?Burning stools, with violent pains in the bowels, with tenesmus, thirst, worse after eating.?Burning and corrosive evacuations; fæces with mucus, or bilious, sanguineous, serous, painless, involuntary, &c., of greenish, yellowish, whitish colour, or brownish and blackish; fetid and putrid evacuations; evacuations of undigested substances.?Emission of mucus by the anus, with tenesmus.?Prolapsus of the rectum: with much pain.?Itching, pain as from excoriation, and burning in the rectum and in the anus, as well as in the hæmorrhoidal tumours, chiefly at night.?Shootings in the hæmorrhoidal tumours.

The state accompanying state of Mind in Arsenicum, will have a picture like this:

1. Mind.?Melancholy, sometimes of a religious character, sadness, care, chagrin, cries and complaints.?Anguish, driving one out of bed at night, and from one place to another in the daytime.?Restlessness.?Great fear of being left alone.?Anger, with anxiety, restlessness and sensation of coldness.?Anxiety, restlessness, and excessive anguish which allows no rest, principally in the evening in bed, or in the morning on waking, and often with trembling, cold sweat, oppression of the chest, difficulty of breathing, and fainting fits.?Anxiety of conscience, as if a crime had been committed.?Inconsolable anguish, with complaints and lamentation.?Hypochondriacal humour, with restlessness and anxiety.?Fear of solitude, of spectres, and of robbers, with desire to hide oneself.?Indecision and changeable humour, which demands this at one time, that at another, and rejects everything after having obtained it.?Despair; he finds no rest, esp. at night, with anguish.?Despondency, despair, weariness of life, inclination to suicide, or excessive fear of death, which is sometimes believed to be very near.?Too great sensibility and scrupulousness of conscience, with gloomy ideas, as if one had offended all the world.?Ill-humour, impatience, vexation, inclination to be angry, repugnance to conversation, inclination to criticise, and great susceptibility.?Caustic and jesting spirit.?Extreme sensibility of all the organs; all noise, conversation, and clear lights are insupportable.?Great apathy and indifference.?Great weakness of memory.?Stupidity and dulness.?Delirium.?Delirium, with great flow of ideas.?Loss of consciousness, and of sensation; dotage; maniacal actions and frenzy.?Madness; loss of mind (from the abuse of alcoholic drinks).

Source: http://www.homeoint.org/clarke/a/ars.htm

Now you can start to piece together what happens when we apply the law of nature, like cures like to resolve the underlying cause.  This is only one of many remedies that will typically be used in your case en route to the Genetic Miasms, the root cause for chronic disease, including yours. We will also work on the psyche and the spiritual aspects of why you incurred the disease in the first place, so that you never re-infect yourself with that old state of mind and reinfect yourself.

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Perhaps one day soon, you’ll be writing us a testimonial like this one:

“I’ve recently been prompted to return to the Crohn’s/colitic/IBS community by a friend since I’m one of those people that managed to break the vicious cycle of these conditions.

In 1999, I was diagnosed with Crohn’s. My case was severe but not atypical: much inflammation and cramping, fistula, abscess. Instead of acute food sensitivities, my reactions were usually expressed by a bowel obstruction every few weeks. 5 months later I had lost 40 lbs (from 110 lb on a 5’5″ frame). I was non-responsive to all of the meds and diets, the bowel resection confirmed necrosis of the tissues.

I had started seeing a sequential homeopath (Heilkunst practitioner) shortly after the surgery and relapsed 4 months later. I gave up on the meds at that point and chose a 100% holistic treatment. I figured that I had nothing to lose if steroids and surgery were going to get me only 4 months of peace!

7 years later I can say that it took about a year to feel like my life was normal again and another 2 years before I was symptom-free. It was a process, not a panacea. Potent and complete probiotics are key, Essential Fatty Acids and nutritional supplementation to maintain a minimum level of nutrition while assimilation is poor. Good day-to-day nutrition, as possible. Environmental doctors provide IV supplementation, it was certainly a life saver for me.

Believe it or not, I’m hugely grateful for the experience now. I learned so much about myself and the how and why of what made me sick. Now working as a sequential homeopath myself, I’m not advocating abandoning whatever treatment you are following, just trying to say that there is hope and lots of help out there.”

Good luck!
Genevieve

Physician Heal Thyself; My Giant Hogweed Expedition

As many of you know, I’ve been on a 7 month retreat, a writing sabbatical, while still serving patients by Skype or phone 3 shortened days a week.  I’ve been working on 3 books intermittently throughout this time; a 3rd book of poetry, “Natural Home Pharmacy for Horses”, and another memoir. After parenting 2 magnificent children, being a wife, researcher and writer/publisher for the past couple of decades, last Summer, I got myself entangled in some “Giant Hogweed” that caused some profound blistering and dermatitis of my skin and near blindness in my left eye.  I was at the hospital daily for a month receiving IV’s of broad spectrum antibiotics and also the strongest doses of cortisone both topically and internally.  I had not seen an allopathic doctor in 25 years.  My body swelled with the cortisone and I described the pain as having kerosene poured on my skin and then lit on fire. I felt deeply ashamed that I could not suss the root cause of my ills and cure them outright. I secretly wondered if I was on my way out as there were few cases recorded in the province where I lived, and I had never heard of this connection between blistering skin and the eye issue before.  It was about 4 months before we had a diagnosis and could administer the homeopathic nosode to address the underlying cause. By then the poison was travelling all the way up my left shoulder and right hand.  I was wearing mittens of gauze while coated in Vit. E ointment, coconut oil, and calendula and neem.  If I took off the gauze the corrosive burning sensation would come back with a vengeance.  I would sadly state, “I’m not an animal,” however, I felt people stare and my clearly debilitating condition like I was a leper.  I bowed my head in frank humility.   IMG_2063 IMG_2477 IMG_2679 IMG_2489                                           Interestingly, during this time, I went very still at my core. I updated my Will, got my affairs in order, lovingly asked my husband to give me some free rein and sought a quiet space 1,300 kilometres from my Maritime home to be alone.  Like an injured animal in the barns I’d grown up working in, I need to go away to ruminate, reflect and get “good with God.”  I was committed not to arriving on his doorstep in my spiritually tattered and broken state. I asked myself multiple times per day, “What do you need Love?”  My internal gesture was,  “You can have anything you want and I’ll do my upmost to provide it for you.”  The maxim, “Physician, Heal Thyself” and to, “thine own self be true” rang in the inner sanctum of my beleaguered mind.   IMG_3034 IMG_3252 IMG_3076 IMG_3434                                           Once alone, I started commit to profound overtures of self-romance.  If I wanted to read a novel in bed all afternoon, I did.  If I wanted to bandage my arm and hands and drive to the art gallery with pencil and paper to sketch, I did.  If I wanted to take myself to the salt water spa in the hills of Chelsea, Quebec, on a weekday, I did. If I wanted to spend the afternoon sipping tea with one of my dearest friends and fellow Heikünstlers, I did.  If I wanted to photograph the sun in her glorious relationship to the rippling blue river, I did.  If I wanted to order Thai food, I did. If I wanted to sit and cry like a 2 year old with such fervour until I threw up, I did! I’d sit on the bank of the river for hours and listen to the geese honking as the sun made her strides across the blue vault of the sky.  I would snap sunset pictures until the glowing orange orb disappeared leaving me in cobalt twilight.   Everything in me prepared to return to my spiritual home.  I read “Sermons on the Mount,” a Tibetan Monk’s take on life and death, a lay minister’s version of putting on the mind of Christ. I was clearly seeking to be ministered to, just as I had for years ministered to my children, husband and patients.  I was curious at all the Christian content, having studied and converted to Judaism decades before, but I wasn’t about to restrict my natural inner yearnings as the resources fell into my lap.  I was going back to my essential self the way I’d been born; re-kindling a relationship to my underpinnings. I very slowly began to heal. By Christmas, nine months after the ordeal had begun, I felt I had a tremulous hold on my life.  I felt gratitude and reverence, holding my more monk-like existence as a cherished crucible to once again, realize “The Path To Cure,” Part II; The Hogweed Edition. My husband came to visit me for a month and we enjoyed a renewal of our relationship on a different level.  We both knew I was still feeling fragile, and he lovingly, albeit reluctantly, continued to give me my space as I faced another 4 months on my retreat.  While visiting with his best friend, Rob, I came to be introduced to a local meditation group in the village where I was living. I’d meditated off and on my whole life since 1975 when I was 12 and suffering anxiety before swim meet competitions.  While I was introduced to Transcendental Meditation (TM), this new group I was trying out more connected to the United Church and related to the teachings of John Main a Benedictine Monk from Montreal.  I’d not meditated in a group since I’d gone through the series of classes when I was 12. Now, 40 years later, I was coming back to the fold of folks who sit in sacred spaces in total silence with their eyes closed. An new Aramaic mantra (Ma-ra-na-tha or “Come Lord”), a short recorded introductory talk by Father Main, a lit candle out of reverence and I felt my body breathe around the gift of my renewing breath.  I was curious what this more consistent practice might bring to me and my recent “Hogweed Event” or what I was now more fondly referring to as my “Baptism By Fire.” About 4 weeks later, I was craving my 30 minute meditation sessions twice per day.  I felt more and more that I was cascading into the depths of silence, a place  of utter stillness lay in the recesses of my soul.  I listened to the throb of my heart-drum on the tableau of sheer tranquility and I felt the fiery hatred and shame leak out the back door of my being.  I quietly waved it goodbye and waited to be led. It was while I was reading Jim Marion’s book, “Putting On the Mind Of Christ” that I stumbled headlong into the core theme of my transcendental healing.  One afternoon, while reading in streams of sunshine by the window listening to the voices of a stunning choir by that famous composer “Anonymous” that I found the essence of my 9 month plight revealed …   

My Complete Story is Now Available as a Kindle Book on Amazon:

The Art Of Falling Apart

5 Star Rating

 

Real, Raw, and Amazing!

by Kassie Ehler

This is by far one of the most honest, raw, emotional books that I have ever read. Allyson shares her relevant lifetime history and how it led her to the ‘baptism’ encounter. Most importantly, she gives a firsthand account of how she sought the true meaning behind her suffering and took it upon herself to dig into the depths of her soul to cure her disease outright – which is her heart’s calling for herself and others.
Aside from the raw account of understanding her truth, Allyson’s writing style has once again left me unable to put her book down until I was finished reading!

Visit Amazon to find out more about this book.

“The Physician Who Can Cure One Disease By Knowledge …”

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Please be warned of over-use of exclamation marks below … written by an enthusiastic Heilkünstler in touch with her inner 4 beat cycle!

 

The purely empirical mind has a tough time with this one. Our Jeff Korentayer, fellow Heilkünstler, describes some days as having gone through, “hand-to-hand combat with the intellect.”

The reason for this is because the intellect sees diseases all broken up into silos. This is the way the Allopathic system is designed with all of its different departments. The bone doctor, the heart doctor, the feelings doctor, the plumbing doctor, the skin doctor, the genital doctor, the bum doctor, etc.  This is anti-wholistic!  You’re not a car made up with disparate parts! Allopathy fits in with the same anti-pathic approached used with their anti-biotics (literally against life) and anti-histamines, anti-depressants and anti-inflammatories.  It is suppressive, or palliative at best; never a wholistic cure. You see it right?!

Think about it, you’re not broken up into a bunch of fragments are you? No, you’re a whole; a sum of all their parts!  Therefore, logically, if teeth and bone are part of the same physiological phenomenon, why then wouldn’t the Dentist, Osteopath, Podiatrist and Orthopaedist all confer together to address the underlying cause of your ills? The cause WILL inevitably be the same!  Makes sense right?!

You are a whole being, why then would you break yourself up into pieces to qualify for an anti-pathic system? Alternatives do precisely the same thing. Steven Decker, Romantic Science Scholar and translator of Dr. Hahnemann’s Organon,  calls the spectrum of alternative therapies, “Allopathy dressed up in chicken feathers!”

Patients will think it most evolved and great that they’ve converted their thinking by seeing the Chiropractor, Psychotherapist, Naturopath and Nutritionist. However, their silo thinking is just being applied using the same empirical gesture.

By using the same reasoning, rationalizing that all is well because it is natural and can’t cause harm is faulty at its underlying roots too. Cure is not obtained using the same anti-pathic reasoning for healative modalities. If your teeth and bones are still crumbling, the root cause has not been eradicated on sound, lawful, natural principles no matter how many natural therapies you apply.  We see this ALL the time!

Once you get it, it just makes rational sense. Right? Then what system of medicine offers the art and science for curing chronic disease based on this reasoning? Heilkunst literally means, the art and science (‘kunst’ in German) of wholing (‘heiling’ in German). So if you have tooth caries (cavities) AND scoliosis, they’re absolutely related. There is one underlying cause and there is one curative homeopathic remedy for it!

Don’t you deserve to know the underlying cause that is precipitating that pathic expression in your whole personhood and then have it treated outright with the single remedy that will annihilate the root cause (tonic disease)?!!! That’s what I thought. It makes sense right? No need to fragment or sacrifice yourself for either allopathy or alternative approaches as Dr. Tilden stated,” The Physician who can cure one disease by a knowledge of its principles may by its same means cure all the diseases of the human body; for their causes are the same.”

Now think of all those cadavers those medical students are still cutting up and sticking into jars of formaldehyde and ask me if you resemble remotely what is lying under their scalpel on that cold metal table?! This is the fundamental approach to teaching medicine. Are you dead? Nope?! Right, I didn’t think so. So why do folks line the office waiting rooms to get into see an officer whose study is based on dead science and cadavers? No, seriously I just want to know.

The right jurisdiction for allopathy is the emergency room, however, when you prescribe the same approach to chronic disease, it becomes a toxic fiasco. Ask a mother who’s child was poisoned by chemotherapy (true story) that has less than 3% efficacy and I will tell you that there was no respect for the whole living principle of that human being. It costs the parent between $350,000 and $1.2 million, though, paid to Big Pharma for that child to be sadly poisoned to death.

Also, don’t get me started on how many hours the Allopath has in the study of nutrition. When I graduated in 2004 from the Hahnemann College for Heilkunst, it was less than 4 hours. 4 measly hours!  The underpinnings of your health in that paradigm is a prescriptive debauchery.

You are a living, breathing miraculous being! Did you know that physics can’t even explain how you’re able to stand erect without falling over? Did you know that you’re being breathed? Try to stop! Did you know that the fact that you think and form speech and reason at all is a culmination of the most mind-blowing epistemological phenomenon imaginable? The fact that you can observe your own self-thinking blows the windows AND doors wide open on your whole human being-ness.  You’re a whole miracle!  You deserve to be treated as one.

Rant ends here!