Sequential Timeline Therapy – Its History, and How We Practice It Today

Also read: What Is Sequential Therapy?

This is Part 1 of a 3-part series.
Part 2 of 3 : How to create your timeline
Part 3 of 3 : Sequential timeline therapy – What it looks like in real life?

Video Transcription

Jeff Korentayer
Welcome to today’s live stream. And we’re going to be taking a look at the topic of “Sequential Timeline Therapy”. And I just want to remind you before we get into it, that you can type your question into the comment box below. If you’re watching live, I will try to answer live right back at you. Or if you’re watching this as a recording after the fact, I will incorporate that into a future video. So let me just switch my screen over to my slide.

“Film Reel”
by Steve Snodgrass
https://flic.kr/p/nJfVwE

As I said, we’re talking about “What is ‘Sequential Timeline Therapy’?” And this will actually be the first of three-part videos. And today is we’re going to be looking at the history and how we practice it today from that history. Next week, we’ll get into part two of the practical question of “How to write down your timeline to start your treatment”. And we will conclude the week after that with part three, “What does it look like in real life?” So looking at some case examples, some reactions, some other things that we have to consider in terms of case management.

“Onion” by Jeff Easter
https://flic.kr/p/57D9Vp

So this is certainly a very familiar concept, the idea of “peeling the onion”. And that is really the idea that disease exists in layers. And the sequence of treatments starts on the outer layer and progressively works in towards the core. So it’s not too difficult to understand of an analogy. And the way I put it here, the complexities of therapeutics can’t be done “all at once”, but must be sequenced rationally (or one step at a time).

“1598”
by Ian Sane
https://flic.kr/p/8hQyfV

Now, if we give kind of a general outline to the history of sequential therapy, the original seeds we actually find back in Dr. Samuel Hahnemann. If we really read his text closely and really understand the concept of what he was talking about, we’re going to see in just a moment that he actually would not have been against sequential therapy. He already kind of outlined the basis of it. Next, we’re going to move on to Dr. Jean Elmiger who was a French Swiss doctor and homeopath. And in the 1970s, he wrote a book called Rediscovering Real Medicine. He actually wrote it in French. I apologize, I don’t have the French title at the tip of my tongue right now. And then we will finally look at how all of the above was expanded through the work of Steven Decker, Rudi Verspoor and Patty Smith in the 1990s. And then finally, how that research has continued to expand and what that means for our practice of sequential therapy today.

So going back to Dr. Samuel Hahnemann. The main concept that we can find that is really important for our purposes in explaining sequential therapy is (and you’ll find other aspects of this I’ve talked about in a previous video, which was on the three outcomes of medicine) you’ll see that Hahnemann talks about how when you have a medicine, which is not similar to the disease being treated. But as he says, you’ll get that newer, stronger disease suspends the weaker one, and then effectively creates a sequence where now this newer disease would need to be cured first. And then what that will reveal is the older disease, kind of comes up from under the surface of that. And then that needs to be treated second or afterwards. So that’s already implicit in Hahnemann, this idea of sequence and the reason why that’s the case. So that’s really important to understand. And that’s as true as he revealed it then. And it’s true as we practice it today as we go through a patient’s timeline. That has never changed. So as I say, remember that, that is at the basis of everything that we’re going to get into in the next couple of minutes. And I’ll give you just a quick example. So very simple. If somebody has an infectious disease, and then that’s suppressed with an antibiotic, well, we’ve now created a sequence of disease where the antibiotics is now the most present disease (it’s kind of the interface, active disease). And what’s behind that, what we’re going to find underneath after we’ve cured the antibiotics disease, we’re going to find the remnants of that original infectious disease are still there under the surface. So we’ll treat the antibiotics disease now. And then what we’ll find pops up afterwards is the remnants of the antibiotics disease. So there you go, a mini timeline (a mini sequence) right there in a really, a very real life example. The other thing we can attribute to Hahnemann, and this came in the last number of years of his life. So after the bulk of his life that he had spent really revolutionising the concept of medicine and his idea of the law of similars and like cures like and how he applied the whole methodology of homeopathy, that was his first revolution. But then in the last years of his life, you can say he had a second revolution which was all about the “chronic miasms”. Now, he discovered three, let’s call it four, he was calling something “pseudo-psora”, which now we understand to be tuberculosis. He hadn’t quite gotten a name for it yet. He hadn’t quite figured out how it was different from psora. He just knew there was something different there. So he had the three miasms in his discoveries and he was kind of verging on that fourth. Something I wanted to say about Hahnemann, but it slipped my mind. Maybe it’ll come back in a moment.

Now, as I mentioned at the top, we will now go into the 1970s where we had the Swiss doctor and homeopath, Dr. Jean Elmiger. And well, this is the English translation of his book. As I’ve mentioned, I didn’t write down his French title. My French isn’t that good, I focus on English. I apologize for that. And as I say, he was an allopathic doctor. But then he was also trained in homeopathy and another other alternative modalities. And he did something very interesting, which was he used a voll machine, or it’s otherwise known as an electro-acupuncture measuring device. And he used that, basically, to detect in his patients where he was not able to make progress through the usual homeopathic methods. Using this device, he detected a number of blockages to cure in the patient, such as some very distinct iatrogenic blockages such as vaccination shocks that were in their system. He discovered other shocks, other medical shocks and other kinds of shocks. And, as well, he verified Hahnemann’s three miasms, but he extended that sequence into four primary miasms. So kind of where Hahnemann was coming to – the psora, the tuberculosis, the psychosis and the syphilis. And then, Dr. Elmiger, he added in the fifth miasm as well, where we now understand is the cancer miasm. So that as I say, it’s quite an amazing read. It’s very engaging prose and it’s quite a joy to read. If you wanted to look at his book, I know it is so available on Amazon. I believe you have to get the hardcopy. I’ve never seen a Kindle version or an e-version. So anyways, we have to do a bit of old fashioned reading with that one.

“Four Seasons – Longbridge Road”
by joiseyshowaa
https://flic.kr/p/5edEmH

And let’s now take Elmiger’s work and we’ll move it forward into the 1990s. That’s where Rudi Verspoor and Patty Smith actually translated his book from the French into the English, and brought his concepts into the English-speaking homeopathic world. [NOTE : Rudi and Patty wrote a brand new book based on Elmiger’s ideas – it was NOT a translation from the French into English.] So they brought forward his concept of the sequential timeline. But they also have expanded it more into the realm of emotional shocks and traumas. So if you are in treatment, if you’re familiar with the NSOL remedy, that’s a huge part of the whole emotional timeline. And we’ll see in the following week’s videos. Of course, we have the very distinct black and white – the physical part of someone’s timeline. If someone’s had a broken bone, or they’ve had a car accident, or some kind of physical trauma – those are very black and white in the sense that we know when they happened. Certain days, certain month, certain year, even the time. We’ll often notice like, “Oh, yeah, this happened at 3pm. And I fell off the ladder and this and this happened.” So that part of the timeline is very black and white. But when we get into the emotional timeline, it doesn’t tend (I mean, it can, but it doesn’t necessarily pinpoint) to us one specific moment in time. But it can tend to occur over a longer extended period of time – days, weeks, months years, where an emotional conflict or trauma is going on over time. So anyways, we’ll get more into that in a future week video. But just to put into context, if you’re familiar with the NSOL and the dropper bottle, that’s what we’re getting out with that remedy. More of that long term kind of trauma, which extends beyond just one point in time. The other thing with Rudi Verspoor and Patty Smith’s work, they expanded Elmiger’s five chronic miasms into the eight that we are treating today. So essentially, there are two chronic miasm per season – spring, summer, fall, winter. Each one of those as far as archetypes, has two distinct miasms. And we will probably do one, or if not a series of videos, on the chronic miasms. There’s a whole world of things we can talk about in there. But just putting this into context, that’s what comes now at the end of the timeline and how Rudi and Patty expanded that. Just as an interesting side note (and we’re going to see this also in the next slide in another form), but somewhere in these years, Rudi had submitted 10 cured cases for a certain homeopathic certification. And he submitted five which were in the classical mode – just based on treating the symptoms. And then he presented five of his cases that he presented in this new sequential mode. And what was interesting, this homeopathic organization, they rejected the five cases from the sequential mode. And the reason I’m bringing this up, what that goes to show is that the whole classical establishment, they’re much more interested in preserving their dogma rather than in revealing and expanding the principles of cure. So, you know, when dogma takes over, the actual purpose of getting results, that something’s gone askew.

“The building thinks on its own”
by sagesolar
https://flic.kr/p/SacxZh

And finally, Where are we at today? So we have, as I say, the sequential timeline that’s even rooted all the way back in Dr. Hahnemann’s work. And that remains the ‘backbone’ of how we practice today. And sort of to play on the point I just said about the dogma of classical homeopathy. Going back to Hahnemann again, we have the diseases of constant nature in opposition to the diseases of variable nature. And the dogma of classical homeopathy today is really has gotten itself stuck on the diseases of variable nature. So you’re treating on the basis of symptoms. We’ve spoken to this in previous videos. But as I say, that is a valid aspect of treatment. But as I say, here, it only accounts for perhaps, maybe up to 5% of treatment success and cures in the whole realm of our whole system of treatment. So, as I say, rooting this whole idea of the sequential timeline, and the constant diseases versus the variable disease, the very idea of the timeline is based on the idea of Hahnemann’s concept of diseases of constant nature. So if somebody is in that mode of classical prescribing, they don’t understand the sequential treatment. They, conceptually, can’t validate it. In fact, they criticize it. They fight against it. But it comes down to this concept where Hahnemann distinguished the constant diseases versus the variable diseases. That’s where we really kind of get the grounding for the sequential timeline. And finally, my last point here. Rudi Verspoor and Steven Decker’s work has further expanded (and continues to expand) into the reaches of Anthroposophy, Orgonomy, and even beyond. And with this idea of the sequential treatments still as the baseline of our whole system, we are continuing to reach further and further into how we can help our patients achieve their health goals that these higher and deeper levels of what it means to be a healthy human being. So, as I say, that in itself will be worth probably dozens of videos in the future. I just wanted to point that out here.

“/ponder“ by Hobvias Sudoneighm
https://flic.kr/p/4gxm4B

So as I said at the top, I am open to answering any questions. If you’re watching live, you can go ahead and enter them into the comment box. Otherwise, I will take up any questions into future videos. And I thank you for joining me today. And, oops, I always forget this little step. Let me just bring myself back on screen again. Say thank you for joining me. I’ll just keep the video live for a moment. I know there’s a delay between when I talk and then when you actually see my video. So if in case anyone’s typing a question, I’ll leave this open. And otherwise I will see you next week.

Part 2 of 3 : How to create your timeline
Part 3 of 3 : Sequential timeline therapy – What it looks like in real life?